The Official Star Trek Movie Forum

The Official Star Trek Movie Forum > Star Trek > General Star Trek Discussions > TV Shows > Enterprise > What Do You Think Happened To Archer After The Series?
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old 11-08-2009, 10:45 AM
kevin's Avatar
kevin kevin is offline
Federation Councillor
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Kilbride, Glasgow, UK
Posts: 21,046
Default

Would the name difference not simply be the difference between it's 'real' Klingon name and an adapted name that's easier for others to say, perhaps?

I kinda took it that way.
__________________
'If the Apocalypse starts, beep me!' - Buffy Summers
'The sky's the limit.....' Jean-Luc Picard, 'All Good Things'


courtesy of Saquist
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:09 AM
kevin's Avatar
kevin kevin is offline
Federation Councillor
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Kilbride, Glasgow, UK
Posts: 21,046
Default

All possible, it's simply because we never were explicitly told the planned relocation actually took place as intended or if anything changed that.
__________________
'If the Apocalypse starts, beep me!' - Buffy Summers
'The sky's the limit.....' Jean-Luc Picard, 'All Good Things'


courtesy of Saquist
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:30 AM
horatio's Avatar
horatio horatio is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,257
Default

Yep, the Feds might have simply helped them to clean up the environmental damage. Or to assume the continuity-is-irrelevant perspective, it was just a way to get the story started, a stand-in for Chernobyl albeit with graver consequences and higher stakes for the Klingons.
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:32 AM
kevin's Avatar
kevin kevin is offline
Federation Councillor
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Kilbride, Glasgow, UK
Posts: 21,046
Default

This is true. Just one of those annoying things since the Homeworld had already been depicted onscreen by that point.
__________________
'If the Apocalypse starts, beep me!' - Buffy Summers
'The sky's the limit.....' Jean-Luc Picard, 'All Good Things'


courtesy of Saquist
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:45 AM
horatio's Avatar
horatio horatio is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,257
Default

I think they tried their best (at least they were more subtle than in GEN) to connect the two generations with Worf's ancestor and Spock's appearance in Unification. The "Spock finally finds the golden middle between his Vulcan and human side" arc from TUC-Unification-ST09 was one of the most beautiful ideas in Trek IMO.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 11-08-2009, 11:56 AM
Commodore's Avatar
Commodore Commodore is offline
Rear Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Starbase 24
Posts: 2,511
Default

Alternate names for Qo'noS used in Trek:
"Kling"
"The Klingon Homeworld"

I think that TNG onwards always depicted Qo'noS as being a murky and gloomy kind of place (no matter what time of the day), but in ENT it was shown as unusually bright and sunny--which would be in keeping with the idea that the planet had suffered some kind of environmental change at some point after the 22nd-Century but before the 24th-Century, IMO...

The destruction of Praxis, however, had more of a devastating impact on the Klingons' economy than on their actual homeworld (which I don't believe they evacuated at all). The Khitomer Accords was, after all, merely a suspension of hostilities (or a "time out") with the Federation until they could clean up Qo'noS and stabilize their economy. Fifty years later, the Klingon Empire was back to full strength--which would be in continuity with events depicted in TNG's "Yesterday's Enterprise".

It was the sacrifice of the Enterprise-C at Narendra III that convinced the Klingons to enter into a genuine alliance with the Federation. In the "Yesterday's Enterprise" timeline, something happened that made the Klingons pull out of the Khitomer Accords and declare war on the Federation instead...
__________________
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
--En Vogue
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 11-08-2009, 12:02 PM
kevin's Avatar
kevin kevin is offline
Federation Councillor
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Kilbride, Glasgow, UK
Posts: 21,046
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by horatio View Post
I think they tried their best (at least they were more subtle than in GEN) to connect the two generations with Worf's ancestor and Spock's appearance in Unification. The "Spock finally finds the golden middle between his Vulcan and human side" arc from TUC-Unification-ST09 was one of the most beautiful ideas in Trek IMO.
The Spock comfortable balancing his two sides was well done over a long time and fed well into his interactions with his younger self in Star Trek - it closed the circle a little bit.
__________________
'If the Apocalypse starts, beep me!' - Buffy Summers
'The sky's the limit.....' Jean-Luc Picard, 'All Good Things'


courtesy of Saquist
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 11-08-2009, 12:13 PM
horatio's Avatar
horatio horatio is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,257
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Commodore View Post
Alternate names for Qo'noS used in Trek:
"Kling"
"The Klingon Homeworld"

I think that TNG onwards always depicted Qo'noS as being a murky and gloomy kind of place (no matter what time of the day), but in ENT it was shown as unusually bright and sunny--which would be in keeping with the idea that the planet had suffered some kind of environmental change at some point after the 22nd-Century but before the 24th-Century, IMO...

The destruction of Praxis, however, had more of a devastating impact on the Klingons' economy than on their actual homeworld (which I don't believe they evacuated at all). The Khitomer Accords was, after all, merely a suspension of hostilities (or a "time out") with the Federation until they could clean up Qo'noS and stabilize their economy. Fifty years later, the Klingon Empire was back to full strength--which would be in continuity with events depicted in TNG's "Yesterday's Enterprise".

It was the sacrifice of the Enterprise-C at Narendra III that convinced the Klingons to enter into a genuine alliance with the Federation. In the "Yesterday's Enterprise" timeline, something happened that made the Klingons pull out of the Khitomer Accords and declare war on the Federation instead...
I think it was kind of both, a way to mix Chernobyl and the problems of the Soviet economy together and translate them into suitable drama as well as a way to increase the stakes for the Klingons. "To be or not to be" is a bit more straightforward than economic troubles.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 11-08-2009, 12:22 PM
Commodore's Avatar
Commodore Commodore is offline
Rear Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Starbase 24
Posts: 2,511
Default

In TUC, the problems with the Klingon economy was more of a reason for why the Federation and the Klingons were entering into peace talks. Arguably, "to be or not to be" was in regards of would there be peace or not between the two nations, IMO.
__________________
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
--En Vogue
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:58 PM.


Forum theme courtesy of Mark Lambert
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2009 by Paramount Pictures. STAR TREK and all related
marks and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.