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  #11  
Old 10-10-2009, 09:33 AM
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Lol! They even have a Supernova threat!!
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:54 AM
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7.Lord of the Flies


I don't know about that one. Lord of the Flies dealt with the savagery within ourselves that appears when civilized society is ripped away or simply nonexistent. The children in this episode were influenced by an outside force.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2009, 11:17 AM
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2. The Twilight Zone, Planet of the Apes or anything

The pilot episode "The Cage" is probably a rip-off of a Twilight-Zone, I just don't know yet, in any case you have to admit it is very similar to "Planet of the Apes".
Buck Rogers (1979) seemed more like a Planet of the Apes rip off to me. At least the part where we have this astronaut going into Earth's orbit, then comes crashing down on Earth in the Future. "The Cage" doesn't strike me as apey. Can you clarify the comparision? Or is this just a R-A-N-T!
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2009, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by chator View Post
Buck Rogers (1979) seemed more like a Planet of the Apes rip off to me. At least the part where we have this astronaut going into Earth's orbit, then comes crashing down on Earth in the Future. "The Cage" doesn't strike me as apey. Can you clarify the comparision? Or is this just a R-A-N-T!
I think the reference is to the Twilight episode where some Earth astronauts land on a planet populated by a race of beings. Only once survivor is nursed back to health and then put on display in a replica earth house that is a cage. Roddy Mcdowell was the Earthman. Episode was titled: People Are Alike All Over (1960)
Also starred Susan Oliver from "the Cage".
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  #15  
Old 10-10-2009, 02:58 PM
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I think the reference is to the Twilight episode where some Earth astronauts land on a planet populated by a race of beings. Only once survivor is nursed back to health and then put on display in a replica earth house that is a cage. Roddy Mcdowell was the Earthman. Episode was titled: People Are Alike All Over (1960)
Also starred Susan Oliver from "the Cage".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Are_Alike_All_Over

I find this in particular to be a very interestingly similar initial storyline - with some additions by Roddenberry to the second half. Having never seen much of the original Twilight Zone, I knew nothing about this episode at all. Thanks for the info.

Also Susan Oliver (Teenya vs Vina?), and the use of matte paintings from Forbidden Planet - which itself was also an inspiration for Roddenberry.
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  #16  
Old 10-10-2009, 03:02 PM
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There is a very good Wrath of Khan review by sfdebris listing all the literature that this movie has... ah... payed homage to. And its quite a lot of homage too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hIV3gLupqU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWAiR...eature=channel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFvZS...eature=channel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7WQq...eature=channel
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2009, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Odradek View Post
in that spirit:

4. Raumpatrouille – Orion

Although no American has ever seen this Star Trek predating little scifi jewel,
the concept of a supervising female officer, who seems emotionless and
sexually repressed while obviously very interested in the captain, sounds very T'Pol and Archer as well as Number One and Pike.
They also had an international crew
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2009, 06:22 PM
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A lot of what Star Trek has done over its 40+ years of existence can't really be called "ripping off", in fact, just about any sci-fi/space fantasy movie/show cannot be truly accused of "ripping off".

If it's one genre crossing into another, it is usually a result of inspiration. Star Trek and Star Wars have taken their inspirations from many classic stories/fables/tales/what nots. Even the B-rate (but completely lovable) "Battle Beyond the Stars" took its inspiration from "Seven Samurai" and "The Magnificent Seven".

A Star Trek TNG episode ("Starship Mine") took its inspiration from "Die Hard". But there are FAR more classic examples of Trek mining past tales to make its own lore, as again, so did Star Wars.

The advantage of writing in the sci-fi/space fantasy genre is that you can borrow from such sources, and make them so derivative that it's actually cool to watch and enjoy.
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2009, 07:08 PM
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Originally Posted by omegaman View Post
I think the reference is to the Twilight episode where some Earth astronauts land on a planet populated by a race of beings. Only once survivor is nursed back to health and then put on display in a replica earth house that is a cage. Roddy Mcdowell was the Earthman. Episode was titled: People Are Alike All Over (1960)
Also starred Susan Oliver from "the Cage".
I watched that Twilight Zone episode a couple years ago. It was quite similar to "The Cage," but not ultra similar. I definitely enjoyed seeing Susan Oliver
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  #20  
Old 10-11-2009, 01:19 AM
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Originally Posted by martok2112 View Post
A lot of what Star Trek has done over its 40+ years of existence can't really be called "ripping off", in fact, just about any sci-fi/space fantasy movie/show cannot be truly accused of "ripping off".

If it's one genre crossing into another, it is usually a result of inspiration. Star Trek and Star Wars have taken their inspirations from many classic stories/fables/tales/what nots. Even the B-rate (but completely lovable) "Battle Beyond the Stars" took its inspiration from "Seven Samurai" and "The Magnificent Seven".

A Star Trek TNG episode ("Starship Mine") took its inspiration from "Die Hard". But there are FAR more classic examples of Trek mining past tales to make its own lore, as again, so did Star Wars.

The advantage of writing in the sci-fi/space fantasy genre is that you can borrow from such sources, and make them so derivative that it's actually cool to watch and enjoy.
The original idea stemmed from certain quarters complaints that the new film took too much from 'Star Wars' and that's not popular with them. The counter to that is merely that 'Star Trek' is no more fully original itself because it's used many, many other sources over the years.

The simple fact is in that context one man's 'inspiration' is another's 'rip-off' - same thing, different POV only.

So, we can either embrace the fact that Star Trek 'uses' these things in it's own way or be annoyed over it. Personally it doesn't annoy me when they do it, but it does - as far as I'm concerned - invalidate any particular criticisms that there's a Star Wars element here and there.

Unless, of course, it's sour grapes that Star Trek found itself in the position of having to take a couple of cues from a vastly successful film in order to help get itself back on track.
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