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  #11  
Old 07-21-2009, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Jed Starkiller View Post
Open the Cargo bay doors hal..
I can't do that, Dave.

Seriously they should have named Jupiter, Hoover instead.
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Old 07-21-2009, 04:34 PM
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I heard this object left a hole in Jupiter the size of the Earth, is this correct? And if it is, that probably resulted in an unimaginably powerful explosion. It might have been somewhat akin to what scientists tell us happened between our own planet and our moon billions of years ago. My question, for all you science types is this: Would such an explosion cause any debris to be flung out into space at such a great velocity that it wouldn't stop until it hit something, like possibly us? Or would Jupiter's great gravity prevent that debris from acheiving escape from it's own massive gravitational field?
Anyone?
I'm thinking that Jupiter's gravity would keep most of the debris from traveling too far. This object superheated the lower atmosphere which churned up a "storm" in Jupiter's atmosphere. If anything survived the burn-up upon entry into the atmosphere probably wouldn't have enough mass to blast particles into space.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:24 PM
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Jupiter is like the Solar System's bouncer or something.

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Old 07-21-2009, 07:32 PM
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The moon functions that way for the earth too. Think of how much spacial debris that good old Luna has swept up for Terra all these eons.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:39 PM
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True. So the Earth has two very helpful pals in our Solar System: Jupiter, the friendly giant, and Luna (the Moon), a tough old gal who keeps the riffraff at bay.



There are some that say that this is why life evolved on Earth rather than elsewhere (part and parcel, perhaps, of the so-called "Goldilocks" theory, taking into account Earth's location in the Solar System's relatively temperate zone). Combination of all these factors -- including, for example, Earth's location, size, and protected status.

One could expand this to include aspects of the anthropic principle, either strong or weak.
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Old 07-22-2009, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Star Trek Viewer View Post
True. So the Earth has two very helpful pals in our Solar System: Jupiter, the friendly giant, and Luna (the Moon), a tough old gal who keeps the riffraff at bay.



There are some that say that this is why life evolved on Earth rather than elsewhere (part and parcel, perhaps, of the so-called "Goldilocks" theory, taking into account Earth's location in the Solar System's relatively temperate zone). Combination of all these factors -- including, for example, Earth's location, size, and protected status.

One could expand this to include aspects of the anthropic principle, either strong or weak.
Perhaps it was all engineered to be that way. Have you seen Ben Stein's Movie: Expelled? He asks questions about the potential for intelligent design, and no one even wants to debate the possibility. It's Funny.
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Old 07-22-2009, 03:52 PM
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Perhaps it was all engineered to be that way. Have you seen Ben Stein's Movie: Expelled? He asks questions about the potential for intelligent design, and no one even wants to debate the possibility. It's Funny.
D'oh! Have I fortuitously "created" a debate about creationism?
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Old 07-22-2009, 03:58 PM
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D'oh! Have I fortuitously "created" a debate about creationism?
No, I'm just asking if Intelligent Design ever poses a potential in anyone's thinking. Seems highly fortuitious for Earth to be in just the right place in space from the sun, to have a magnetic core that protects us from radiation, having the moon(the largest satellite in ratio to the planet it orbits), and this massive gas giant sweeping up spacial debris. There's a massive amount of coincidences that make life possible for us here.
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Old 07-22-2009, 04:17 PM
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Jupiter Struck by Object, NASA Images Confirm

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

AP/NASA/JPL

July 20: A large impact on Jupiter's south polar region is captured by NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

PASADENA, California — A large comet or asteroid has slammed into Jupiter, creating an impact site the size of Earth, pictures by an Australian amateur astronomer show.
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed the discovery using its large infrared telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, said computer programer Anthony Wesley, 44, who discovered the impact zone while stargazing at home.
News of Wesley's find on a backyard 14.5-inch reflecting telescope has stunned the astronomy world, with scientists saying the impact will last only days more.
Wesley said it took him 30 minutes to realize a dark spot rotating in Jupiter's clouds on July 19 was actually the first impact seen by astronomers since a comet collided with the giant planet in July 1994.
"I thought (it) likely to be just a normal dark polar storm," he said on his website.
"However as it rotated further into view and the conditions improved I suddenly realized that it wasn't just dark, it was black in all channels, meaning it was truly a black spot," Wesley said from his home at Murrumbateman, north of Canberra. Photographs show the impact zone, or "scar," near Jupiter's south polar region, with gases seen in infrared images.
"We are extremely lucky to be seeing Jupiter at exactly the right time, the right hour, the right side of Jupiter to witness the event. We couldn't have planned it better," NASA JPL scientist Glenn Orton told the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper.
Orton confirmed the spot was an impact site and not a localized weather event in Jupiter's swirling surface, similar to the planet's famed red spot.


Just in case you missed the story.
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Old 07-23-2009, 03:56 AM
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Originally Posted by TGElder View Post
No, I'm just asking if Intelligent Design ever poses a potential in anyone's thinking. Seems highly fortuitious for Earth to be in just the right place in space from the sun, to have a magnetic core that protects us from radiation, having the moon(the largest satellite in ratio to the planet it orbits), and this massive gas giant sweeping up spacial debris. There's a massive amount of coincidences that make life possible for us here.
To answer your question, I'm afraid it doesn't. I think that the anthropic principle answers my puzzlement about the otherwise weird-seeming Goldilocks coincidences regarding our Earth.

More generally, the more I know about history, the less I find myself believing in God as an all-powerful, all-compassionate entity.

The phrase "world-weary" comes to mind.

I should think that for me to become more religious in the future, I will probably have to start "disremembering" what I have learned. I'm sort of serious about that.

I think that humanity has so many flaws, is so arrogant, so inherently weak and vulnerable, that it's rather disappointing to consider that people are created in God's image, if that's true.

Someone once said that even if can believe in a powerful God, there is nothing to prevent some other even more powerful God, a super-God, from also existing. Maybe the reason that God wasn't created was that some other even more powerful or older or now-deceased God created HIM.

We really can't know.

I don't think that the ID thesis proves otherwise.

Last edited by Star Trek Viewer : 07-23-2009 at 04:00 AM.
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