The Official Star Trek Movie Forum

The Official Star Trek Movie Forum > Star Trek > Off Topic Discussions > Film grain
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-16-2009, 12:08 PM
Samuel Samuel is offline
Vice Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,882
Default Film grain

Anyone know of a filter that can be used in compositing to achieve a realistic subtle film grain? The stock photoshop filters for this purpose arent very good and too unrealistic. Some of the various 3rd party filters and/or techniques I have found are quite good for stills but I havent found one used for animations.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-16-2009, 01:26 PM
Elizadolots's Avatar
Elizadolots Elizadolots is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,466
Default

When you say "animation" what exactly do you mean?
__________________


Thanks to Ron Salon for the signature banner!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-16-2009, 01:33 PM
martok2112's Avatar
martok2112 martok2112 is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: River Ridge, LA
Posts: 6,458
Default

Some animation/film editing programs actually come with a "film grain" filter that can be adjusted according to how old you want the movie to look. I think Magix Movie Edit Pro series comes with such a feature.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-16-2009, 01:41 PM
Samuel Samuel is offline
Vice Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,882
Default

Things like the typical 30 second tests of flags blowing in the wind... or for a Trek centric example... a rotating ship. Basic ones like the PS 'film grain' filter do a decent job but are still obviously computer generated. iMovie has a stock filter also but suffers from the same problem. Yes... I know more specialized software for Macs are harder to come by. But considering how much Macs are pushed as the best at A/V I would think there is.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-16-2009, 01:46 PM
martok2112's Avatar
martok2112 martok2112 is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: River Ridge, LA
Posts: 6,458
Default

Although Macs are obviously superior when it comes to video/audio production, this is why I stick with PC's. There's just more stuff out there for it.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-16-2009, 04:47 PM
Elizadolots's Avatar
Elizadolots Elizadolots is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,466
Default

So, this isn't anything like a .gif animated file, it's a video? (sorry to be dense)
__________________


Thanks to Ron Salon for the signature banner!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-16-2009, 06:19 PM
Samuel Samuel is offline
Vice Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,882
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizadolots View Post
So, this isn't anything like a .gif animated file, it's a video? (sorry to be dense)
Nah not dense at all.

Eventually I will be rendering an animation, probably through Blender (or something else), and I am checking out various ways to add film grain to it. Not sure about the size yet. Probably the original will be rendered 1920x1080 and then downsized to whatever format needed. Im not nearly there yet but just thinking about the future.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-16-2009, 09:19 PM
Elizadolots's Avatar
Elizadolots Elizadolots is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,466
Default

I ask because I only know how to do .gif animations...and, if I were doing one and needing "film grain" I'd make a layer of film grain myself and then duplicate it and rotate it randomly...merge one "film grain" layer with each layer of the animation. I suspect what bothers you about the photoshop filter is it's consistency....by creating a separate layer, you could make sure the grain seemed to bounce around as film grain is wont to do....If I get the chance, I'll try to make a sample for you.
__________________


Thanks to Ron Salon for the signature banner!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-16-2009, 10:30 PM
Samuel Samuel is offline
Vice Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,882
Default

The best film grain example I saw was actually a high resolution scan of a 35mm negative of a perfectly blue sky. The color was removed and it became a great grayscale noise field. Noise itself is random in its size in addition to its gray value. There are other things but I am looking at the possibility of using the various techniques to create a large number different noise images then combining them into a repeating video. A bunch of extra work and limits fine tuning in the editor but it should work.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-17-2009, 04:13 AM
Zardoz's Avatar
Zardoz Zardoz is offline
Federation Councillor
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Somewhere In The Future
Posts: 31,432
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by martok2112 View Post
Some animation/film editing programs actually come with a "film grain" filter that can be adjusted according to how old you want the movie to look. I think Magix Movie Edit Pro series comes with such a feature.
I use mine in Pinncle to match my titles and "previews" to match the film I'm converting.
__________________
"High Priestesses Of Zardoz" By Eliza's Starbase Of Avatars Copyright 2009."
"Zardoz Speaks To You, His Choosen Trek Fans."
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:17 AM.


Forum theme courtesy of Mark Lambert
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2009 by Paramount Pictures. STAR TREK and all related
marks and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.