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Old 06-12-2009, 04:45 AM
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Angry How Long Will It Take for Us to Get to Mars?

At this rate, I don't think we'll get to Mars before 2035, and maybe 2050. Reason? Lack of political will, technical delays. All the usual.


Last edited by Star Trek Viewer : 06-12-2009 at 04:52 AM.
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Old 06-12-2009, 05:14 AM
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Or we spend the money on more urgent things.
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Old 06-12-2009, 05:19 AM
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Or we spend the money on more urgent things.
What's more important than ensuring the long-term survival of the human race?

There's always going to be someone who wants more money for their own personal reasons or for allegedly more urgent things. The latest cause is global warming. But if you postpone exploration until everyone is happy with everything, it's never going to get done.
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Old 06-12-2009, 05:51 AM
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I don't think our survival depends on Mars explorations.
Exploration is fine and neccessary, but not if it's so very expensive. How many people could get better medical care for all that money?
Make them spend it on life, as Kirk said...
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Old 06-12-2009, 06:22 AM
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Maybe it is for the best. We should save our planet first before going to other ones.
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Old 06-12-2009, 07:48 AM
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Ah, but you forget the serendipity effect: we go to dig for worms, we strike gold. Were the Venus probes a waste of time and money? Considering they gave us TONS of data about CO2 in the atmosphere, and out of control greenhouse conditions... They were insturmental in gathering data about global warming. How about the probes to Jupiter? Has studying the vast storms there an on the other gas giants of the soloar system given us any practical data on meteorology? (The answer is yes.)
What about the development of technology to get us there and back? As you may recall, computers used to take up entire rooms, but thanks to some of the advances in micro electronics brought about by the space program, we all have supercomputers on our desks that put CRAY systems from twenty years ago to shame. Astronomy, biology, geology, electronics, chemistry... pretty much all the hard sciences have benefitted from our efforts to reach the moon, and get probes to all the strange new worlds of the solar system. Because of it, a substantial portion of our GNP is produced via industries that capitalize on those discoveries... and there is no end in sight, so long as we have new challenges before us.

But you want to pull back from that?
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Old 06-12-2009, 08:23 AM
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Ah, but you forget the serendipity effect: we go to dig for worms, we strike gold. Were the Venus probes a waste of time and money? Considering they gave us TONS of data about CO2 in the atmosphere, and out of control greenhouse conditions... They were insturmental in gathering data about global warming. How about the probes to Jupiter? Has studying the vast storms there an on the other gas giants of the soloar system given us any practical data on meteorology? (The answer is yes.)
What about the development of technology to get us there and back? As you may recall, computers used to take up entire rooms, but thanks to some of the advances in micro electronics brought about by the space program, we all have supercomputers on our desks that put CRAY systems from twenty years ago to shame. Astronomy, biology, geology, electronics, chemistry... pretty much all the hard sciences have benefitted from our efforts to reach the moon, and get probes to all the strange new worlds of the solar system. Because of it, a substantial portion of our GNP is produced via industries that capitalize on those discoveries... and there is no end in sight, so long as we have new challenges before us.

But you want to pull back from that?

The reason Venus HAS global warming is because of 2 things, its CLOSER to the sun, and its atmosphere is 10 times DENSER than our atmosphere. Mars has a 95 percent CO2 Atmosphere yet its average temperature is -40 degrees C.
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Old 06-12-2009, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by FanWriter45 View Post
Ah, but you forget the serendipity effect: we go to dig for worms, we strike gold. Were the Venus probes a waste of time and money? Considering they gave us TONS of data about CO2 in the atmosphere, and out of control greenhouse conditions... They were insturmental in gathering data about global warming. How about the probes to Jupiter? Has studying the vast storms there an on the other gas giants of the soloar system given us any practical data on meteorology? (The answer is yes.)
What about the development of technology to get us there and back? As you may recall, computers used to take up entire rooms, but thanks to some of the advances in micro electronics brought about by the space program, we all have supercomputers on our desks that put CRAY systems from twenty years ago to shame. Astronomy, biology, geology, electronics, chemistry... pretty much all the hard sciences have benefitted from our efforts to reach the moon, and get probes to all the strange new worlds of the solar system. Because of it, a substantial portion of our GNP is produced via industries that capitalize on those discoveries... and there is no end in sight, so long as we have new challenges before us.

But you want to pull back from that?
The sad part is humankind is trying to unwittingly recreate Venus here on earth.
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Old 06-12-2009, 10:22 AM
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At the rate we're going, and with all of the other problems we have on our plate, and the fact that the world is going broke, and that space exploration is totally stagnant and has been put on the back-burner, I'd say maybe, just maybe we might get there by 2100. To get there sooner we'd all have to pool our knowledge and resources. The United States, Russia, China, Great Britain, Europe, and every other nation that is willing and able to contribute. When are we going to learn that it isn't about being enemies? When are we going to learn that we're all stuck on the same planet? It's about the future of humanity, and not who has the most toys or who is the super power. Because to tell you the truth, none of us are lookin' really super right now.
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Old 06-12-2009, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Star Trek Viewer View Post
At this rate, I don't think we'll get to Mars before 2035, and maybe 2050. Reason? Lack of political will, technical delays. All the usual.

That's too optimistic! What's the big deal with manned-space flight anyway, if probes are cheaper and can give us the data we need. I think we should keep on improving robotics and making our probes more sophisticated. As for manned flight, there is still much work to be done on the Moon, setting up space telescopes there and what not. We shouldn't risk a man to Mars yet, IMO. We need to improve our propulsion technology. If we send a poor soul out there and something goes wrong and the guy is stranded out there, how are we going to rescue him?
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