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Old 05-31-2009, 08:08 PM
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Default nuTreknology: perfectly simple question.

Why assume that the new 'classic' computer interfaces are inherently better than the classic classic ones?

Can multitouch only work on perfectly flat surfaces that offer no tactile feedback?

The computer displays showed just 'blinking lights' that appeared to only indicate, really, little or nothing -- but what about augmented reality technology? What if the characters were shown things by those displays that we, the audience, didn't see?
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Old 05-31-2009, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
Why assume that the new 'classic' computer interfaces are inherently better than the classic classic ones?

Can multitouch only work on perfectly flat surfaces that offer no tactile feedback?

The computer displays showed just 'blinking lights' that appeared to only indicate, really, little or nothing -- but what about augmented reality technology? What if the characters were shown things by those displays that we, the audience, didn't see?
I had always thought, with the classic series, that there was some kind of actual readout (obscured from the camera, but obviously somewhere on the computer terminal) that the character using the computer would see, and that the blinky lights were just a way of showing that the computer was processing data. Much the same as we've always wondered: what does Spock see through that bright blue scanner of his?
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Old 05-31-2009, 08:49 PM
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Touch screen is quickly becoming the norm in this century.

The Nintendo DS, the iPhone, the BlackBerry.

Entire PCs are now constructed by HP which primarily use a touch screen interface.

I would fully expect them to NOT to revert to TOS style interfaces in the actual 23rd Century.

Your complaint is not something that works against the movie, in fact it actually makes the movie more believable.

There are battleships from the 60's with more detail and more sophisticated interfaces than the TOS bridge.

In other words.

GET OVER IT.

The only thing that stopped the TOS Bridge from looking better and more believable was a lack of budget. All they had to go on was imagination.

I'm sorry you have a problem with it, but even current technology has actually caught up with our imagination, we can now use both to make things look and work better. And now we actually have the money to get it all done.

This is the strangest and most easily refuted complaint I've heard yet.
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Old 05-31-2009, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by martok2112 View Post
I had always thought, with the classic series, that there was some kind of actual readout (obscured from the camera, but obviously somewhere on the computer terminal) that the character using the computer would see, and that the blinky lights were just a way of showing that the computer was processing data. Much the same as we've always wondered: what does Spock see through that bright blue scanner of his?
Or its all just a bunch of hooey so an old idea of what new technology will be like wont fall by the wayside. Kind of like saying all those fishtails on old cars are more advanced than aerodynamics on a 2009 Lexus.
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Old 05-31-2009, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by martok2112 View Post
I had always thought, with the classic series, that there was some kind of actual readout
Nah, it was like The Matrix; they were able to read all the blinky lights like the scrolling text. Scotty had his programmed for the lady in red on repeat.

What that means for Pike is they really didn't like him.
Just a blinky for yes/no. He could have said so much more, but they were tired of his blathering and cranky attitude. Number 1 this and Number 2 that.
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Old 06-01-2009, 03:38 AM
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You know, one other thing you forgot to mention. It seemed as though that the gumdrop buttons seemed to be touch sensitive, you didnt have to physically press down on them. Im wondering if they used the same technology they use for the clickwheel on an Ipod (pre Ipod Touch BTW)
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Old 06-01-2009, 03:51 AM
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In The Cage Spock controlled some bridge equipment with a gesture. I don't remember if that was edited out in the remastered version but that gesture control I thought was very cool and futuristic. When I saw Tom Cruise controlling computers with hand movment in the air in Speilberg's Minority Report, I thought of The Cage. I'd love to see that in Trek. Again.
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Old 06-01-2009, 04:02 AM
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Most of the Original Series consoles had a display or gauge of some sort, along with all the unmarked chunky flashing lights. Those screens didn't always display something, and when they did it was often a static graph or such, but there was the potential for them to provide genuinely useful info.

The gripes about the Original Series designs aren't that the fictional technology is somehow 'primitive', only the way it's fabricated on the set - with lumpy lightbulbs and switches that look like they were assembled for spare parts bought from an automotive electrician. It'd take some serious self-deception to look at those today and say, "yup - pure twenty-third century, a technology far beyond our own."

:Edit: the Original Series did, of course, do a damn fine job with the available materials and budget, considering its era. I'm not disputing that at all.
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSnyder4 View Post
What that means for Pike is they really didn't like him.
Just a blinky for yes/no. He could have said so much more, but they were tired of his blathering and cranky attitude. Number 1 this and Number 2 that.
Heh heh heh heh heh heh heh heh heh.

To somewhat answer the question, we no longer write books in Latin or Old English, so it stands to reason that we no longer shoot our scifi films in 1960's Cheezoid Style.
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Old 06-01-2009, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
Why assume that the new 'classic' computer interfaces are inherently better than the classic classic ones?

Can multitouch only work on perfectly flat surfaces that offer no tactile feedback?

The computer displays showed just 'blinking lights' that appeared to only indicate, really, little or nothing -- but what about augmented reality technology? What if the characters were shown things by those displays that we, the audience, didn't see?
*opens mouth*..........is....is this really worth a debate?
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