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Old 05-20-2009, 02:26 PM
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Default Is Star Trek (2009) Roddenberry-style Trek?

I've had this question on my mind for the last several days. And while I know some will glibbly reply that because this movie has all the external trappings of Trek and Paramount's official seal of approval, as well as the support of O.S. actors like Nimoy and Shatner, that this movie is or must be Trek. I wanted to offer some quotes from Shatner's Star Trek Memories , that describe Roddenberry's original vision.


"Like Swift (Jonathan), Roddenberry realizes that if he were to write a thinly veiled and substantive societal commentary within a less obvious and somehow more acceptable framework like fantasy or science fiction, he might be able to actually speak out on some fairly important, even controversial topics.

Gene knew that he wanted his science fiction show to be different from the genre's standard, and tired, run-of-the-mill mix of self-important good-guy astronauts, evil mad scientists, cute kids, scary monsters, rocket ships and robots.

Gene always felt that the best science fiction was really about people, and not gadgetry, explosions or the solely scientific mysteries of space. Toward that end he grounded his series ideas in reality, humanity and the interactions and adventures of the [Enterprise's] crew. He stayed away from fantastic devices and scenarios that didn't at least conform to some thread of the known and accepted laws of physics. He also avoided superhuman characters with whom the audience could not possibly identify.

As you can see, Gene was not about to build his show around the prevailing cliches of TV science fiction. Instead, he based his ideas around believable stories, solid dramatic priniciples of human conflict and easily identifiable, uniquely "human" characters. He felt that as a writer it made no difference at all what genre of story he was telling, as long as it conformed to the most basic rules of drama. Science fiction, he felt, was no exception. If his characters were believable, if the action built to an exciting climax and if the storyline held up thoughout, Gene felt that the audience was certain to empathize and identify with his familiar, recognizable characters, even if they were seventy-two million miles from home."

While I'm sure there are some episodes or movies in virtually every series that violate one of more of Roddenberry's principles, I thought we should reflect on what made Star Trek different from every other science fiction series before or after it.

Last edited by chator : 05-20-2009 at 02:31 PM.
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Old 05-20-2009, 02:48 PM
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Short answer;

YES!!
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Old 05-20-2009, 02:53 PM
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IMO, it isn't exactly what we would call Roddenberry-style Trek, which I would see as being more cerebral like The Cage/TMP/TNG and featuring a much more brainy, thought-provoking plot. This one more resembles the just plain fun style of TWOK/TUC that Nicholas Meyer brought to the film series. While that particular style of Trek had never quite appealed to me before in TOS films, its TNG counterpart FIRST CONTACT was heavily influenced by the latter style of Trek film. But truth be told, this is the first of ANY of those movies to leave me damn near speechless and in tears by the time the film was over. It was THAT good.
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Old 05-20-2009, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catch22 View Post
Short answer;

YES!!
I'm not as certain as you are that it is. And I fear that Trek might be moving towards more traditional forms of science fiction storytelling to make it more "popular".
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:05 PM
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Depends on whether or not he considered his style a work-in-progress. I doubt anybody truly knows and people will believe what they want... even tho some will insist they do.
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catch22 View Post
Short answer;

YES!!
Long answer;

YES.. VERY MUCH SO!!!
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:15 PM
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So much science fiction these days tries to be edgy, introducing one POS distopia after another. 1984 is an example. This is depression porn.

Star Trek has a positive message. The world will become a better place, not worse. We will wan't to belong to trek's time, it's a place of wonder, freedom and tolerance. I think we all know trek's vision to be the true vision, just compare 1950 today, the world is better now. No polio, we have a black man in the White House and more women attend univerity than men these days.
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:16 PM
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If GR had access to this level of effects and writing in 1966 for a movie, this might have been what we saw.
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:24 PM
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This is an obvious NO.
This is far short of his standards of cerebral which was his nature. That's not even a POV room on this. This is Abrams Star Trek.

He said others would have a crack at Trek...but he didn't say he'd like what ever they did.
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Old 05-20-2009, 03:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
Depends on whether or not he considered his style a work-in-progress. I doubt anybody truly knows and people will believe what they want... even tho some will insist they do.
I tend to agree with this; does anyone think they can sum up Gene's "vision" in one paragraph?
And if so, look at it, then compare what you've typed to what you've seen in the new film and see if anything matches.
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