The Official Star Trek Movie Forum

The Official Star Trek Movie Forum > Star Trek > Star Trek XI: The Movie > The Good Trek Movie Guide: How to ensure your film doesn't suck part 1
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-10-2008, 06:26 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default The Good Trek Movie Guide: How to ensure your film doesn't suck part 1

PART 2 AND 3 THREADED BELOW!!!!

If this indeed is a genuine opportunity to influence the film, then I think it's worthwhile to talk about the last 10 films and discuss what made them great or bad. There is a common thread in the 'good' films although I'm sure that some people will jump in to defend their obscure love for the bad ones - so be it.

My critic of the past films is below, but to get to the point in a hurry - this is my checklist for making a good Star Trek film based on the past successes and failures:

1. Use only known settings, planets and races visited or mentioned in the original series. The shows did enough exploration, the films should focus on the content that has been provided by them. The Star Trek Universe is rife with choice.

2. Do not kill of a major character unless you intend to bring them back - even if the actor says 'Pretty Please!'

3. Do not ham up a one-time-only hero to star with the crew - we don't need them and they'll ruin the film. Focus on the original 7 (and minor characters such as Chapel, Sarek, etc.) Also, give all the characters time and provide a story where they work together as a team.

4. For the love of god, do not destroy the Enterpise or damage it to such an extent that it has to be towed back to Earth. Done to death and stupid.

5. Go easy on the comedy. Keep it in check and in character.

6. Root the story with something from the series its drawing from and use the film as an opportunity to extend or wrap it up. The most successful Trek Films did just that. (STII, STVI, STVIII)

7. Don't invent a one-time villian - again, use prexisting material such as a known baddy from the series or a choice villian race such as the Klingons, Romulans, Tholians, etc. (bring back Harry Mudd!)

8. Easy on the romance. Keep the clothes on and the kissing to a minimum please. There's a galaxy to run.

9. Include some air time for homeworlds such as Earth (headquarters), Vulcan, Romulus, etc...we don't have to be in Space for the entire thing.

10. Include at least one space battle and ensure that it lasts for at least 15 min. Make it cunning and clever. See STII and STVI for ideas.

MOST IMPORTANTLY: If in doubt, ask Nicholas Meyer.



Story Tangents:
Here is a breakdown of things that I think may cause a bad film if not treated right and will definitely bomb if too many are used. (and 'no', prequels are not exempt)

InventaVillian: This occurs when the writers ham up some left-field alien menice or 'evil' character that the Enterprise Crew must fight off and kill, chase away or turn good(worst one of all).

InventaHero: This occurs when the writers ham up some left-field hero character to star with the Enterprise Crew (because 7 just isn't enough, is it?) and generally dominates the story while the Crew play comic relief until the new character dies, runs away or finds 'happiness'(the worst one).

InventaSpecies: This occurs when writers decide that the dozens of prominate alien species graciously provided by the collective effort of The Original Series, TNG, DS9, Voyager and Enterprise(actually, ignore that one) just aren't interesting enough and take it upon themselves to generate a story-specific species. The species can either be good or bad (or both) and are typically in peril, causing peril or are just perilous to look at. Rest assured, by the end of the film they will either be vanquished, find happiness or see the error of their ways and turn good(worst one).

He'sDeadJim: This occurs when the writers (or the actor) thinks it's their god-given right to kill off a key character for dramatic effect. Never a good idea when the whole franchise is built around the cast (unless it's Tasha Yar or Dr. Polaski)

PlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet: Similiar to the previous but this time involves blowing up the Enterprise for dramatic effect. Not recommended unless your story is air-tight (unfortunately most writers think their stories are) and leaves new writers to pick up the pieces after the old writer is canned. As a general rule, the Enterprise can be beaten to a pulp if needed, but never destroyed. As it's already been done to death, doing this again would be a sure-fire way to self-destruct your film.

WhereTheHeckAreWe: This occurs when the writers decide on a setting completely unfamiliar to all previous content (because the Star Trek universe just isn't big enough, is it?) and send the Crew to accomplish some goal in a place where there's zero chance of seeing a familiar species, good or bad. By the end of the film, the setting is made redundant by either blowing up or just leaving no reason to ever return - ever.

WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout: Refers to a bizarre moment or plot twist that just seems out of place, feels weird and has you looking around in embarrassment - like showing up to work without your pants.

Ok - so here's my wrap-up:


Star Trek: The Motion Picture
- 1.5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Special Effects and Cinematography around The Enterprise (don't we all just love EVA inspections of our special lady!), Klingons show up for a cameo, we get to see DeForest Kelly in a mountain-man beard

Suffers from:
-InventaHero (x2)[Decker/Ilia]
-InventaAlien [V'Ger the poor, lost space probe (Yack!)]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe (kindof) [V'Ger - it's the villian and the set all-in-one]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout [final scene with Decker/Ilia, Spock's weirdness -and obsession with V'Ger]

Arguable Failures: Terrible story, dominated by cheesy characters we've never heard of, contains an alien that no idiot on crack would take on unless they knew in advance that it was just a film and they were assured survival. Finally - there just seems to be no humour in this film whatsoever. Everyone is just so, so serious! -Lighten up, your depressing the audience. Soundtrack was weak (and no - I don't like the TNG tune) does little to lift the movie - if anything, it seems to make STTMP feel like dead weight by overemphasizing the dark moments and doing nothing for the happy times. The setting is crap because most of the film is inside some great monstrosity and the only time in the film the Enterprise actually gets to fly around a little - IT BREAKS DOWN! A big yawn about some dumb guy named Decker and his bald-headed android telephone with laryngitis. Thankfully, this is the one film that I did not see in the Cinema.




Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
- 5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Return of a well known villian from the original series, Lots of Space battles, soundtrack is one of James Horner's most rivetting masterpieces, classic bantering between Spock and McCoy, great plot twists and lots of catch phrases: "I spit my last breath at thee!", endearing moments done eloquently and staying true to character without cheese, humour is executed extremely well and in character.


Suffers from:
-He'sDeadJim[Spock]
-InventaHero(x3)[Saavik, David, Carol]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Regula I]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout[Tiberian Bat remark according to some]

Arguable Failures: Some people complain about the 'special edition' and the Tiberian Bat remark made by Scotty's nephew, but for the record, that was in the original film (I saw it in the theatre in 1982) and stands out in my memory as a great comic moment - The audience in the theatre laughed, why can't you? Spock's death is a bit of a downer, but well done and left nicely hinting at resurrection. Kirstie Ally is a bit of a left-field insertion as 'Cadet Saavik' and probably gets more airtime than deserved-but the character holds well in the end. Carol Marcus is new but may have been based on Dr. Janet Wallace in the original series - and to be fair, I have made that connection myself although I realise they're different in name. David is new, but doesn't take over the plot and fits well into the story. The space station is not really well known - but space stations are cool.

Last edited by rabbitc : 02-10-2008 at 07:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-10-2008, 06:27 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default > The Good Trek Movie Guide: How to ensure your film doesn't suck part 2


Star Trek III: The Search For Spock
- 3 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Builds on the story from STII, introduces the Klingons into the motion picture plot after years of waiting, introduces the totally-cool Bird of Prey and most importantly: brings a hero back from the grave in a way fits the story (very hard to do)., first look at a mighty Starbase, The uber-cool Excelsior class vessel and a great break-out scene. Horner adds a few movements to his great soundtrack from STII and runs into STIII nicely. Lloyd plays a great Klingon villian and we get to see John Larroquette (Dan from Night Court) as a Klingon too! Once again, comedy executed perfectly.


Suffers from:
-TheresPlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet [destruction of Enterprise]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Genesis Planet]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout[McCoy's conversation with the smuggler]

Arguable Failures: Destroying the Enterprise was pretty controversial among fans at the time, but to be fair - it was a hell of a bang and a great act of revenge on the Klingons - I still think of Lloyd's character shouting 'GET OUT OF THERE!!!' as the countdown hits zero - a classic moment to be sure. The movie does suffer a bit with too much time on Genesis and fans are almost thankful when it finally blows up. We also hate to see the crew on their proverbial knees for the majority of the film and the ending leaves you feeling a little empty know that the Enterprise is gone once and for all. Spock only gets about 5 seconds of 'back to his old self kindof' and so the film always feels one-man-down until the very end: integral to the story, sure - but it does impact the film. Finally, what was with that stupid, creepy alien McCoy tries to hire? -"Genesis????? Genesis allowed is not! Is Forbidden!" - give me a break! Annoying to listen to, ugly and makes no sense - I hate annoying aliens, don't you?





Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
- 4 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Builds on the story from STII, STIII - first attempt on the tried and true travel-back-in-time-to-Earth model that served the original series so well (after all, 'The City on the Edge of Forever' is the highest-rated episode) - also hailed as the highest-rated film among non-fans which is a big accomplishment. Starts off with lots of space trauma and ships falling by the wayside. Love the vaporizing oceans and the doomsday message from Earth. Comedy is on the edge of goofy but still within character and who can't help but laugh when Scotty shouts 'There be WHALES here!' Most importantly - we get the Enterprise back in the form of 1701-A and nicely wraps up a saga that started with STII and finishes with Kirk and the Crew back where they belong. Feels good, fun to watch and classic Trek and has a great original soundtrack. Don't we all love the scene where Spock pinches the Punk Rocker???

Suffers from:
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout(x6!)[Spock in a bathrobe, Spock in a bathrobe, in a pool with his underwear showing, 'See you round the galaxy', close-up of Shatner's plugs while swimming,'don't tell me fish stories kiddo', time-travel dream sequence, laughing at the dinner table]
-InventaCharacter[Gillian the Oceanographer]
-InventaVillian[The Space Probe]

Arguable Failures: There's just so many strange moments in this film despite its resounding success. First, we have Spock running around in a bathrobe for virtually the entire film while trying to 'blend in' - shah! Second, we get to see his Hanes tighty-whities in the pool. We witness a rather strange goodbye between Kirk and Gillian with the cheesiest line ever: 'see you round the galaxy' , some bad acting when Gillian's boss utters the fish stories remark and an artistic approach to the unconcious mind when the Crew pass out during time-travel (luckily it only happens on the outgoing journey) and a moment when Kirk is chuckling in the Italian restaurant. Also, Gillian seems to dominate the film a bit too much, but I suppose you need an anchor character being back in time and all. I don't know - there's just something on the cusp of annoying about the character that just feel happy when they ship her butt out once and for all.(hopefully she got assimilated)
We also get a close-up of Shatner's plugs when he's swimming in the ocean (Yes Bill, it looks very real) The probe seems reasonable although some think it's a little odd. I thought it was pretty star-destroyer like in the cinema and played an effective menance - but some may disagree. Main Problem with STIV?-No space battles.




Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
- 0.5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Sybok gets killed performing psychotherapy on God.

Suffers from:
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout(x9)['your a vulcan!' scene, Spock's rocket boots, row row row your boat, Scotty knocks himself out, Sybok and McCoy having good cry together, Uhura's diversion, Bird of Prey clobbers God, row row row your boat again, Malfunctioning Enterprise]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Nimbus III, Sha Ka Ree]
-InventaVillian(x2)[Sybok, Sha Ka Ree Entity (god)]

Arguable Failures: My god, where do you start? First, we open with quite possibly the wussiest scene in Star Trek with a half-wit alien being 'helped' by Spock's estranged brother (didn't you know?) and it's at the first critical scene when a 'ping' goes off in your brain and you realise you're about to witness the greatest train wreck in Star Trek history. Lesson learned - don't give Shatner the script. Anyways, aside from a completely uninteresting premise, we see Spock zoom around in cheesy rocket boots, Kirk and McCoy sing row your boat, Scotty knock himself out on a bulkhead (and gets captured, idiot!), McCoy having a 'break-thru' with Dr. Phil Medicine Vulcan, Uhura doing a feather dance in the desert, more camp singing and an Enterprise that spends most of the film trying not to come apart at the seams. Throw in two settings that NOBODY has ever heard of or cares about, an unconvincing sibling of Spock that starts bad, turns good THEN dies (yack!) and a mighty alien posing as God that gets defeated by a BIRD OF PREY (come on!) and you have an abomination of a film that deserves credit soley for making 'Generations', 'Insurrection' and 'Nemesis' look good. (sorry to give away the plot) This entire film plays out like the final scene of StarWars:Episode III - cheese, cheese and more cheese.




Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
- 4.5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: The film kicks off with one of the best explosion sequences in ALL CINEMA and really made use of theatre surround sound that was only just emerging at the time. The soundtrack definitely plays an important part in this film and is memorable, powerful and emotional at times. 'Ready for Departure' is perhaps one of the greatest moments in Trek is featured in this film and brings a tear to your eye when the Enterprise clears the docking bay into deep space with a proud Scotty watching his warp engines hum away. The story is firm and focuses on the oldest rivalry in the franchise which bring familiarity while allowing for an all new story to emerge. No strange aliens, no god-like entities, no time travelling - just some classic Federation vs Klingon Empire punch ups with a classic conspiracy plot to drive it home. The characters are given room to flourish while everything stays firmly fixed to the plot. Comedy is present but kept in check and in character. Space sequences are elegant and beautifully rendered (the torpedo ripping through the Enterprise-A had my jaw dropping) and finished with an explosive final battle ("Target that explosion and Fire!") It is Meyer's second masterpiece and it delivered the most tasteful, eloquent and emotional send-offs that the original crew could have ever dreamed of. While there's a couple quirks that keep this film just shy of STII's greatness, it is a technical and literary marvel that hits you on all angles from the carefully framed cinematography to the gripping race against time to prevent an interstellar war. Backed by a fantastic soundtrack it is a plausible story where one crew (or 2 in this case) makes the difference for the benefit of the galaxy by working as a team and putting all of their individual skills into play. Memorable moments a-plenty: Uhura speaking Klingon, Kirk fighting the knee-genital alien, on-location shooting in Alaska, tag-team action with the Enterprise and the Excelsior.

Suffers from:
-InventaHero[Lt. Valeris]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout(x3)['Russian Epic Cinderella', Lt.Valeris has a mind-meld orgasm, Klingons bleed Pepto-bismal]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Rura Pente]

Arguable Failures: There's not much to complain about with STVI, but I suppose if I had to nit-pick, it would be Lt. Valeris - this might have come down to casting as I somehow feel that Cattral seemed a bit uncomfortable with the role at times and spends a lot of time in the spotlight forcing Chekov and Uhura to play second-fiddle. As for strange moments, the Lt. Dax scene was a tad cheesy, Pink klingon blood was a bad decision although I imagine they were trying to prevent the Chancellor's death scene from being too bloody, and who can forget Valeris getting (ahem) probed by Spock - OK, I understand that a forced mind-meld could be painful but sheesh! Rura Pente is an unfamiliar place deep in the Klingon empire, but well set and believable. Luckily, none of these departures really harm the film - just shave .5 of the 5 out of 5 mark.

Last edited by rabbitc : 02-10-2008 at 06:36 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-10-2008, 06:28 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default The Good Trek Movie Guide: How to ensure your film doesn't suck part 3


Star Trek VII: Generations
- 2 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Some good cinematic sequences with the Enterprise-D, decent soundtrack although a bit lacking at times. Brilliant opening sequence featuring the Enterprise-B christening. Closing credits music is one of Star Trek's best themes. Malcolm McDowell delivers a solid performance despite being an invented villian and suffering bad writing. Neat scene where Data and Picard check out Stellar Cartography.

Suffers from:
-InventaVillian[Dr. Soran]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Veridian III, Nexus]
-PlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet[Enterprise gutted again thunderbirds-style]
-He'sDeadJim[Kirk bites the big one]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout[Worf's dorky promotion, Data goes mental, Life in the Nexus, Kirk's Retarded Death, Enterprise crash sequence]

Arguable Failures: Generations was a really frustrating movie for me because I really wanted to like it - and I do to some extent. However, there are noted failures including the need for Dr. Soran the evil El-Aurian to stir up trouble when there's a host of bad guys (what about Romulans, Cardassians, dominion, etc?) to choose from. No fault to McDowell who played the role well - but it just doesn't really drive the story and you have no connection with the villian other than the fact you want to see him defeated. Most of the film take place a-way out there and focuses on a planet called Veridian III which looks a lot like the California desert- pretty boring. The Nexus was stupid. The Enterprise crash looks almost silly and very model-like. Kirk's death seemed rather pointless and unspectacular. Worf's promotion sequence started ok but then decended into slapstick. And the clincher? -Data goes through the whole film trying not to have a nervous breakdown - ayyee! Dumb story set in the middle of nowhere just to see Kirk die and get buried on a mountain (so much for the state funeral, Jim). Feels like a pro-longed episode of TNG




Star Trek VIII: First Contact
- 4.5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Definitely the 'Wrath of Khan' for the Next Generation - STVIII pits the TNG crew against their old adversary: The Borg - this film just couldn't go wrong. The movie hits hard with an etheral opening theme to guide the credits (Goldsmith's best IMO) and presents the eery needle-in-the-eye bit that shake Picard awake: Awesome! The opening sequence of this top-three film features -you guessed it - a space battle! ...and a beautiful sequence as well with ships looping and banking as they swarm around the Borg cube. There's an intense level of action throughout the film and some tried and trusted time-travel to bring the best elements of STII (return of a villian), STIV (travel back in time) and STVI (down and dirty space battles) into one blockbuster of movie. Memorable moments throughout including Data's 'Greetings' as he gets pelted with bullets, switching off the emotion chip, walking upside down on the sexy Enterprise E and some comical moments with Cromwell's brilliant performance as Cochrane. Again, lots of comedy but kept in check and in character, great emphasis on the 'team effort' element which makes this film shine. The film looks big and is big - great story and visually excellent using pre-existing material.

Suffers from:
-PlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet[Enterprise didn't get destroyed, but almost did]
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout[skin-graft scene]


Arguable Failures: Not much to gripe on here, really. I suppose the suggestion that Picard might destroy the Enterprise towards the end provoked feelings from the audience - you could hear people saying 'Oh no, not again!' Luckily, this never materialized. The only other thing that kind of grinds on me is the whole skin-graft scene with Data and the Queen. Not because it happened, but because Brent Spiner really does look as though he's going to make a mess of himself after she's blows air over the skin graft - that's just disturbing, ick...




Star Trek IX: Insurrection
- 1.5 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Good space sequences featuring the Enterprise E although it never really gets into a proper fight. Enjoyed the moment when Riker grabs the 'ole joystick to steer the Enterprise through the Briar Patch. The destruction of the Space Platform was semi-satisfying. Opening scene with Data, Picard and Worf singing HMS Pinafore is classic!

Suffers from:
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout(x8)[UPDATED][shaving Riker/bathtub scene, stupid kid with pet, Admiral Dougherty face-stretch death, Admiral Dougherty struggles over his own name, Picard's love in with the Ba'ku woman, the Son'a leader cry of frustation "nooooooo", Data playing hide and seek, Picard does the Mambo in his quarters (thanks to ThePhaige)]
-InventaVillian(x2)[Son'a and Dougherty]
-WhereTheHeckAreWe[Planet'X', Briar Patch]
-InventaSpecies(x2)[Ba'ku and Son'a, arrgh enough with the apostrophes!]

Arguable Failures: Insurrection is another collapse of bad story that never recovers and reeks of being thrown together without any real thought or revision. In fact, I would argue that Insurrection is the point at which everything started to turn sour for the entire franchise including TV. Aside from the great opening scene, the fun quickly fades as the story sets in about some strange race being tormented by another strange race being assisted by some strange Admiral that can't pronounce his own name, all set on some strange planet that is referred only as 'The Ba'ku Homeworld' - Blah blah blah blah yack! Just to add salt to the wound, we also have to watch a rather out-of-place side story with Riker and Troi playing bathtime, curse a stupid kid for chasing his fuzzy worm thing and holding up the refugees, watch in horror as Data prances about in a haystack, writh in pain as Picard gets all romantical, roll eyes at bad acting from the Son'a and watch strange admiral die the most bizarre and least convincing death ever written in the history of the franchise (yes, it topped Tasha Yar's tarpit death). Feels like another pro-longed TNG episode that would probably have you reaching for the remote if it showed up on reruns. Crap Trek.

Updates: Special thanks to ThePhaige who reminded me of the scene where Picard does the Mambo in his quarters. (Does anyone remember the scene in First Contact where he's listening to Berlios at full volume? -that was a good scene); This scene was stupid and completely out-of-place.




Star Trek X: Nemesis
- 1 stars (out of 5)

Successes: Good space battle, Scimitar design is cool, desert dune buggy thing was kind of neat.

Suffers from:
-WhatTheHeckWasThatAbout(x5)[Data singing at the wedding, Romulan council wiped out, B4 singing same dumb song at the end, Shinzon's 'illness' and treatment, Enterprise ramming the Scimitar]
-InventaVillian(x2)[Shinzon, Remans]
-InventaHero[B4]
-He'sDeadJim[Data gets blowed-up]
-PlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet[Enterpise-E gets quasi-wasted]


Arguable Failures: For what was confirmed to be the last TNG-crew motion picture, the folks at Paramount really shafted fans with this piece of junk. It's kind of remarkable, actually - because even a monkey could have cranked out a better script involving the Romulans (see STVI) by keeping it simple - but no, instead we get 'Nemesis'. A film involving the Romulans had been hoped, dreamed and pleaded by fans for years since the films began. When we finally get one, the film starts off by killing the entire council! WHAT?! Instead of a nice, comfortable slug-fest with the Romulans, we get never-before-mentioned Remans lead by some genetic clone of Picard named after the presenter of 'Iron Chef' (god help us) - and we ALSO get some sort of Data clone with the dumbest name since 'NOMAD' that has the mental capability of a half-witted brussel sprout (oh joy!) It seemed that this entire film was written solely to satisify the selfish gripings of Brent Spiner and Patrick Stewart as it spends way too much time on the character development of Picard and Data. Was that the price of these actors gracing us with their presence in the film? If so, Paramount should have shut down production and sent everyone home because not only did this film flop big-time (it only made 7mil worldwide) it is not and never will be on my DVD shelf. The film drags for the first 3/4 as we're burdenoed with Picard yakking about himself, Shinzon and Data while Shinzon yaks about himself and Picard while Data yaks about himself and B4. The last quarter is partly redeemed by an old-fashioned space punch up only to be ruined by dumping the Enterprise and killing of Data in one fell swoop. (Double take - are they serious???) I'm unsure what Berman's facination with wrecking the Enterprise is, but it certainly paralleled his career after once again ripping the front off the ship and killing a major character. Now apparently Data's death was done at the request of Brent Spiner - I'm sorry, but actors should not have that much influence and if those were the stakes they should have told Spiner to take a hike (where's the mighty career now, Brent?) Story is boring and unconvincing in trying to explain why Shinzon is just so darned evil - plus, we came to see a fight with a Romulan, not some human clone. Rubbish Trek and thankfully the last we'll ever see of the TNG crew. Of course, I suppose Riker and Troi get to live 'happily ever after' - but did anyone really care? Not me.

Last edited by rabbitc : 02-12-2008 at 07:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-10-2008, 06:54 AM
robinalexander robinalexander is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 40
Default

InventaVillian: This occurs when the writers ham up some left-field alien menice or 'evil' character that the Enterprise Crew must fight off and kill, chase away or turn good(worst one of all).

sure Khan was an exception but keep using old characters is boring.

InventaHero: This occurs when the writers ham up some left-field hero character to star with the Enterprise Crew (because 7 just isn't enough, is it?) and generally dominates the story while the Crew play comic relief until the new character dies, runs away or finds 'happiness'(the worst one).

new characters keeps story's alive.

InventaSpecies: This occurs when writers decide that the dozens of prominate alien species graciously provided by the collective effort of The Original Series, TNG, DS9, Voyager and Enterprise(actually, ignore that one) just aren't interesting enough and take it upon themselves to generate a story-specific species. The species can either be good or bad (or both) and are typically in peril, causing peril or are just perilous to look at. Rest assured, by the end of the film they will either be vanquished, find happiness or see the error of their ways and turn good(worst one).

what no new species?! the galaxy is huge. showing old species is boring and not movie material.

He'sDeadJim: This occurs when the writers (or the actor) thinks it's their god-given right to kill off a key character for dramatic effect. Never a good idea when the whole franchise is built around the cast (unless it's Tasha Yar or Dr. Polaski)

That made STII better than the rest. sacrifice is one of the best story devices there is.

PlentyOfLettersInTheAlphabet: Similiar to the previous but this time involves blowing up the Enterprise for dramatic effect. Not recommended unless your story is air-tight (unfortunately most writers think their stories are) and leaves new writers to pick up the pieces after the old writer is canned. As a general rule, the Enterprise can be beaten to a pulp if needed, but never destroyed. As it's already been done to death, doing this again would be a sure-fire way to self-destruct your film.

in ST3 it was a high point. the story was about saving spock. and by sacrificing the enterprise to acomplish that goal was awesome.

"WhereTheHeckAreWe: This occurs when the writers decide on a setting completely unfamiliar to all previous content (because the Star Trek universe just isn't big enough, is it?) and send the Crew to accomplish some goal in a place where there's zero chance of seeing a familiar species, good or bad. By the end of the film, the setting is made redundant by either blowing up or just leaving no reason to ever return - ever."

new movies cant make new locations?! thats how movies are getting boring.

WhatTheHeckWasThatabout: Refers to a bizarre moment or plot twist that just seems out of place, feels weird and has you looking around in embarrassment - like showing up to work without your pants.

the bar scene in ST3 shows how bad mccoy/spock needs to go to genesis to get his body back. using a weird alien only shows the diversity of the staqr trek universe.


By resstricting yourself this way you will never get a good, original movie/story.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-10-2008, 06:56 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default

whatever - read the whole thing, mate.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-10-2008, 07:03 AM
robinalexander robinalexander is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 40
Default

I did. and by saying that Trek movies suffers form new locations, new characters, REAL story telling (Important People actually dies and other events that cant be reversed in one movie), is just plane silly.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-10-2008, 07:05 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default

The past speaks for itself, mate.
Perhaps you can chat about it with Berman on the bread line.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-10-2008, 07:10 AM
omicron's Avatar
omicron omicron is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Belgium
Posts: 37
Default

I think 'InventaVillian'/'InventaHero' are bad only when used to create a species for that specific purpose.

However the movies should not restrict themselves to people who were already in the series.
New characters can be used without harm. After all, most episodes introduce new characters... Why can't the same be true for the movies?
__________________
Divide and conquer works... Destroy and conquer works even better
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-10-2008, 07:12 AM
rabbitc rabbitc is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Vulcan
Posts: 64
Default

Because it doesn't work - the track record proves it.
Look - there's no hard and fast rule to say that you can't do these things - I'm just saying that pileing too many on will crash the film.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-10-2008, 07:14 AM
omicron's Avatar
omicron omicron is offline
Ensign
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Belgium
Posts: 37
Default

that's your opinion, not mine... It's not the fact that they invented a hero/villain, it's the fact that they didn't do it well enough that makes a movie suck.
__________________
Divide and conquer works... Destroy and conquer works even better
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:50 PM.


Forum theme courtesy of Mark Lambert
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2009 by Paramount Pictures. STAR TREK and all related
marks and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.