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The Official Star Trek Movie Forum > Star Trek > General Star Trek Discussions > Trek Tech > Ships, Devices, etc. > If you put a 100 foot ship in orbit, could you see it from the Earth's surface?
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  #21  
Old 01-05-2009, 12:31 PM
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Saquist Saquist is offline
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You would only see a bright star.
But he asked if you could see the shape of the ship...and that would definitely be a no
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  #22  
Old 01-07-2009, 04:21 AM
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In Star Trek it has been shown that at night a ship in orbit would just look like a bright star, most would think it to be a shooting star. With a telescope you would be able to make out the shape of the ship, but no real detials.

As for in real life, I have no idea but I would figure that it would be close to what we have seen in Star Trek.
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  #23  
Old 01-09-2009, 09:40 AM
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The orbit the Enterprise D normally orbited at would make it really hard to see the ship at night unless you really knew the night sky.
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  #24  
Old 01-10-2009, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vuedoc View Post
Maybe where you guys live, but with the amount of light polution here in NYC you're lucky if you can see the moon sometimes.
That's something I'm actually proud of, Doc. Here in in Central Arkansas, the night skies are AMAZINGLY dark and clear. I had to buy myself a telescope after moving out this way about 8 years ago... I've also been part of pushing a bit of local legislation, as part of my Astronomy Club. We got a few codes enacted that will help keep the light on the ground, rather than in the air.
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  #25  
Old 01-14-2009, 05:54 PM
briandechile briandechile is offline
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Okay, forgive me for this but: there was this guy named Rayleigh and he developed a solution to your question. He said that the resolution of an object seen in normal red/green light (with clear skies) is based on its angular size. So, seeing a 1000 ft enterprise will depend on how far out it orbits. The closer the orbit the easier it is to see.

Rayleigh found that humans can see things that have an angular length of .007 degrees, (this is where the eye doctor gets that ridiculous chart with the rows of letters). So with some trigonometry, the farthest that the 1000 ft ship can be and still be able to make out the length of it, is

D=1000ft/tan(.007)= 8185111 ft or 1550 miles.

Weather satellites orbit around 164582 miles, so that's too far to be seen.
The Hubble telescope orbits at about 354 miles so it would be seen there.

So as long as the enterprise stays outside of 1600 miles then we will only see it as a moving star.

Anybody know what the supposed range of a transporter is?

It would be a real bummer if they had to give away their position in order to beam down!
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  #26  
Old 02-04-2009, 12:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saquist View Post
Starships orbit in a parking orbit well above the atmosphere.

No they don't, because just like your rather long explanation of warp drive (in reply to my point that Star Trek is Fantasy rather than real Sci Fi) Star Ships are just fiction. They don't really exist, so they don't orbit at any height. I really think that you take Star Trek rather to0 seriously.
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  #27  
Old 02-07-2009, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FanWriter45 View Post
That's something I'm actually proud of, Doc. Here in in Central Arkansas, the night skies are AMAZINGLY dark and clear. I had to buy myself a telescope after moving out this way about 8 years ago... I've also been part of pushing a bit of local legislation, as part of my Astronomy Club. We got a few codes enacted that will help keep the light on the ground, rather than in the air.
Look up Dark Sky

http://www.darksky.org/
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  #28  
Old 02-07-2009, 11:46 PM
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I've seen satellites and the ISS plenty of times, so a colossal starship would be no problem. It'd be, as others have said, a large bright star - but you'd definitely see it.

Now, what I'd really like to see from Earth is the immense starbase from the earlier Trek movies and The Next Generation. I reckon you could probably see that one fairly clearly, perhaps even during the day, because of its sheer size.
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  #29  
Old 02-09-2009, 01:25 PM
MagaditH MagaditH is offline
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The best way to solve this is just build a starship and find out.
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/H...ation_Starship
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  #30  
Old 02-11-2009, 09:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MagaditH View Post
The best way to solve this is just build a starship and find out.
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/H...ation_Starship
I used this guide to build a starship out of ferrocement and rebar in my own back yard. Unfortunately the neighbors saw what I was doing and called the law and government officals confiscated my home made warp core. Hence the recent explosion of "ufo" sightings. And to think they didnt even compensate me for all the hard work...

The ferrocement hull goes up on ebay next week. No reserve!


As far as seeing an orbiting 1000ft starship from Earth, of course you could. But it would more than likely just appear as a fast moving point of light, much like the ISS, maybe brighter. You would, however, be able to see it's shape by using a telescope or maybe even high quality binoculars.

Last edited by WarpFactorX : 02-11-2009 at 09:21 PM.
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