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  #11  
Old 10-31-2008, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Saquist View Post
I didn't know you were a writer.
I thought you were an engineer.
Writers and engineers think very much alike, in my experience.
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  #12  
Old 10-31-2008, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunny1 View Post
Technically speaking, we authors don't get paid to write - THAT, we do for free. What we get paid for is the sale/leasing of the rights to the story, and that's what you'd be paying The Saint for - which means that you could, legally, turn around and find a publisher to purchase said story from you at their own going rate, and recoup some or all of the money spent...

(Theoretically...)
Actually, that's just what one of my customers does regularly. In that sense, you could think of me as a freelance ghostwriter.
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  #13  
Old 10-31-2008, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
Writers and engineers think very much alike, in my experience.
Having, for the past decade-plus, made a living as a writer I have to (very mildly) disagree.

I have, as a writer, incorporated what I had already known, as well a what I had subsequently learned, in 'quote 'Real Life(TM)' unquote' into my writing - but, more importantly, I have learned not to incorporate 'too much' reality into my writing. Ignore the fact that it is 100% accurate - more important is whether or not the reader will BELIEVE it...

I have held a great many different 'jobs'; I have had a half-dozen different 'careers'... all of them great learning experiences from which to include tiny fragments of 'realism' into my writing to make it believable. To tell the 'truth, whole truth, and nothing but the truth', however, would 'kill' me as a writer.

'Realism' is what people live day-to-day, free of charge... 'fantasy, (of one stripe or another), is what they are willing to pay for IN ORDER to escape mundane, dreary 'reality'....

Engineers can, better than any, describe the REALITY.... an AUTHOR is the one who can distill that explanation down into what is important for a PLOT...

(*Grin*)
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  #14  
Old 10-31-2008, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
...freelance ghostwriter.

...well, that's a defining term. I mean, really - how many 'famous ghost-writers' are there? (*Grin*)

Postscript: Ignore Lustbader's 'Bourne' series in place of Ludlum; Eric ISN'T a 'ghostwriter'; his own pre-existing fan-base corrupts/denies the concept. Ironically... 'look at those who YOU DO/CAN/WILL NOT KNOW...'...

(*Grin*)
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  #15  
Old 10-31-2008, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunny1 View Post
Having, for the past decade-plus, made a living as a writer I have to (very mildly) disagree.

I have, as a writer, incorporated what I had already known, as well a what I had subsequently learned, in 'quote 'Real Life(TM)' unquote' into my writing - but, more importantly, I have learned not to incorporate 'too much' reality into my writing. Ignore the fact that it is 100% accurate - more important is whether or not the reader will BELIEVE it...

I have held a great many different 'jobs'; I have had a half-dozen different 'careers'... all of them great learning experiences from which to include tiny fragments of 'realism' into my writing to make it believable. To tell the 'truth, whole truth, and nothing but the truth', however, would 'kill' me as a writer.

'Realism' is what people live day-to-day, free of charge... 'fantasy, (of one stripe or another), is what they are willing to pay for IN ORDER to escape mundane, dreary 'reality'....

Engineers can, better than any, describe the REALITY.... an AUTHOR is the one who can distill that explanation down into what is important for a PLOT...

(*Grin*)
Oh, I don't disagree with that whatsoever. I should have been more clear with what I meant when I said that writers and engineers think alike.

It's a writer's function and privilege to create realities. Sometimes borrowed more or less heavily from the reality we all actually live in, sometimes created nearly from the ground up. But for however many pages or minutes we have readers' or viewers' attention, we draw them into an entire world very carefully and exactingly constructed to present our story.

The story, likewise, is a mental structure which must be designed and built. The nuts and bolts must be placed precisely, but the entire structure must be so artfully executed that those who look upon it never see the nuts and bolts, the girders and beams. They must instead see art if we permit them to consciously take note of the structure at all as the story sweeps them along.

There are three levels of storytelling: When it's good, it's science. When it's very good, it's art. And when it's at its best, it is the closest thing human beings have to complete union between souls.
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  #16  
Old 10-31-2008, 07:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunny1 View Post
...at whom was that comment directed?
You know, men that use the word "whom" correctly make my eyes spin around. It also outs them as writers.
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  #17  
Old 10-31-2008, 10:43 PM
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Not all of us do that. Though we all can. I can even trump that with the proper use of 'thy' and 'thine' if necessary.

'Thy' is used when the next word begins with a hard consonant. 'Thine' is used when the following word begins with a vowel or a silent soft consonant followed by a vowel.

Ex: "Thy carriage.", "Thy horse.", "Thine honor.", "Thine ardor."
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  #18  
Old 10-31-2008, 10:50 PM
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This above all, to thine own self be true, and it must follow as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man. (or somehow similar, I don't trust my memory)

Thanks for that info about thy and thine. May I ask you as non-native speaker if you know as writer until when these terms like thy, thou and so on were used? I only stumble across them when reading the Bard.
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  #19  
Old 11-01-2008, 05:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
...I can even trump that with the proper use of 'thy' and 'thine' if necessary.

Thou art correct, sir.

(*Grin*)
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  #20  
Old 11-01-2008, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by horatio View Post
This above all, to thine own self be true, and it must follow as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man. (or somehow similar, I don't trust my memory)

Thanks for that info about thy and thine. May I ask you as non-native speaker if you know as writer until when these terms like thy, thou and so on were used? I only stumble across them when reading the Bard.
The works of Shakespeare and the King James Bible are likely the two most common places you'll encounter Elizabethan English. Here are a couple interesting links for you:

http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/L...guagesubj.html

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/el...dictionary.htm
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