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  #11  
Old 05-18-2008, 10:49 AM
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I'd forgotten that one. But true.. Although the Romulan Captain had little reason to fight seeing that she could now report that the Tal Shiar had been penetrated by Star Fleet. Giving them a black eye and using the excuse of the vitality of that info as a reason to not fight the Enterprise.
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Old 05-18-2008, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Akula2ssn View Post
I don't know if that is really generally accepted. You would kind of have to cloak the construction of the facility to begin with. Not to mention be able to make sure that the procurement of the materials for the construction of the facility and development of technologies as well as the construction of the ship was not noticed. The Romulans certainly had a garrison on Remus to oversee the slave labor and account for the amount of work done as well as what was being produced as a result of the labor done. With the totalitarian system that the Romulans had, I find it highly unlikely (but certainly not impossible) that they wouldn't have noticed something odd happening in their home system. I actually suspect that where ever the Scimitar was built, the Remans probably had help from someone. And if the ship was indeed built in the Romulan home system like in orbit of Remus, then they probably had some help from within the Romulan government. When you think of it, we really do not know when the conspiracy between the Remans, Tal'aura, Donatra, and Suran began.
Somehow I think a movie about how someone like Shinzon came to power and how a ship such as the Scimitar was built right under the Romulan's noses may have been more interesting than Nemesis itself!
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  #13  
Old 05-18-2008, 11:00 AM
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Somehow I think a movie about how someone like Shinzon came to power and how a ship such as the Scimitar was built right under the Romulan's noses may have been more interesting than Nemesis itself!
Can probably actually do a small series of movies about that, depending on how you go about it. The Remans were not the only group in Romulan society that had grievances against the Romulan government. And then there's the usual cutthroat nature of Romulan politics.

Another story of unrest in the Romulan Empire is told in the Rihannsu novel series which spans a total of 5 books.
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Old 05-18-2008, 11:03 AM
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The best thing to come out of Nemesis were the Remans, I thought. The idea was intriguing. I have never read any of the star trek novels. Been thinking about picking one up. Any suggestions?
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Old 05-18-2008, 11:11 AM
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I actually think that a lot of the ENT novels were written better than the actual television episode. If you want to try the Rihannsu series, then save yourself the trouble of buying all five books and just get the one called "The Bloodwing Voyages", that will cover the first four books in the series. After that, then get the last book called "The Empty Chair".

Another novel that I think was particularly well done was called "Sarek". If I remember the author's preface correctly, he consulted Mark Leonard about the character of Sarek when he wrote the novel. The story is set just after ST6 and fills in some stuff about the character of Sarek, his relationship with Spock and Amanda, as well as adds a twist to the conspiracy in ST6. However, parts of the ending were a little cheesy to me.
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Old 05-18-2008, 01:29 PM
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I'll check it out, thanks for the suggestions! Are the books, considered canon? How many generally are? I read some where that Orci, one of the writers of the new movie considers the novels canon, is that wide shared among others?
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Old 05-18-2008, 01:42 PM
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Well to my knowledge, none of the books I've mentioned are considered canon.

Here's the section of novels in the wikipedia article about Star Trek canon. You can draw your own conclusions.

"
The original novels published by Pocket Books are not considered part of the canon.[1] This was a guideline set early on by Gene Roddenberry, and repeated many times by people who worked with him.
And as long as Gene Roddenberry is involved in it, he is the final word on what is Star Trek. So, for us here – Ron Moore, Jeri Taylor, everybody who works on the show – Gene is the authority. And when he says that the books, and the games, and the comics and everything else, are not gospel, but are only additional Star Trek based on his Star Trek but not part of the actual Star Trek universe that he created... they're just, you know, kinda fun to keep you occupied between episodes and between movies, whatever... but he does not want that to be considered to be sources of information for writers, working on this show, he doesn't want it to be considered part of the canon by anybody working on any other projects.[3]— Richard Arnold, 1991
However, even this rule is not without its exception. Two Voyager novels written by Jeri Taylor, Mosaic and Pathways, were written early on in Voyager's run and detailed the background of the show's main characters.[1] These were meant to be canon, and to be used as references by the show's writers when fleshing out the characters. These two novels are sometimes named as exceptions to the "no book is canon" rule.[12] However, as some of the background information mentioned in those books was never referenced in an episode of Voyager, their status as canon is still open to debate.[1]"
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  #18  
Old 05-18-2008, 01:48 PM
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For completeness, here's the section about novelizations of episodes and movies.

"The novelizations of episodes and movies are not considered canon. This is a tradition that goes back to Gene Roddenberry himself. Roddenberry wrote a novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, which included many tangents and new material that were not part of the movie, such as revealing that the woman who dies in the transporter accident was Kirk's lover.[13] While this novel filled in many gaps left in the movie, Roddenberry is quoted as saying it should not be considered canon.[14]"
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Old 05-18-2008, 02:16 PM
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Thanks for the info akula!
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  #20  
Old 05-18-2008, 07:31 PM
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Oh and if you do decide to read Sarek, there are points in the book where Sarek will be thinking about when he first met Amanda and as well as when Spock was a young boy. Among these memories is an incident where Spock went out into the desert and was rescued by Sarek's distant cousin, Selek, who seemed "strangely familiar" to Sarek.

This is a direct reference to the TAS episode, Yesteryear. Selek is actually Spock, who travels back in time through the Guardian of Time. You can read more about it in Memory Alpha.
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