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Old 11-20-2013, 02:21 PM
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Default When We Lose Antibiotics, Here's Everything Else We'll Lose Too

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/11/end-abx/

Hmm?
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Old 11-20-2013, 05:10 PM
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A possible solution exists that is a very tough sell politically, which is to add a little silver dust to fertilizer. When a field is first plowed, tiny particles (16 or fewer atoms each) of silver are taken up by the roots of plants and protect not only the plants but those who eat them from most infectious diseases to some extent. The airlines are required to press their waste water through silver mesh to disinfect it before jettisoning it, following NASA's lead and using hardware developed for NASA, which also is not allowed to dump water that hasn't been disinfected. A handheld version can be purchased for disinfecting lake water when camping. And silver kills almost every known infectious bacteria, fungus, and virus.

Colloidal silver is sold bottled, but the technology for making it as it should be apparently hasn't been developed, so companies cheat a little by adding albumin to the mix. There are machines sold by mail order with which people can make the real thing fresh by electrolysis. But who's going to bother? It requires distilled water. And I'm not so sure about the quality even then. But as a bottled product, the real thing (no albumin) would have too short a shelf live to be commercially viable. But adding silver dust to fertilizer would imitate what happened in the days of hunter-gatherers, when trace minerals in the soil were not depleted by reuse of land for agriculture. And so far, pathogens have not been known to develop resistance to silver. But a piece of silver in the bloodstream has to be very tiny, and one chunk can kill a huge number or germs before it passes out of the body through the skin.

People have complained that colloidal silver can cause argyria, a slight discoloration of the skin, which is actually harmless and only noticeable if someones takes huge amounts of albumin-suspended silver to fight some disease resistant to everything else and keeps getting reinfected.

At some point the pathogens are going to win. But any solution capable of eliminating infectious disease would scare the hell out of the medical community, wouldn't it? Theoretically, any technology capable of that would raise the choice of putting half the doctors out of business or passing on it and suffering widespread hardship, perhaps even extinction. In the case of silver, the list of pathogens resistant to it is very short. It actually doesn't need FDA approval, since it was in use before the FDA was formed, making it exempt from the approval process under the FDA's charter. But they can still stop venders from making claims about it.

Many people know that dropping a dime into a vase of water with cut flowers with delay wilting, but a penny will do that, too, since copper has the same effect, albeit to a less extent than silver. In the days of covered wagons heading west, it was common to toss a silver dollar into a barrel of milk to delay souring.

There has been some bad press about colloidal silver, but one has to wonder about the motives behind it, since treating infectious disease is really big business. And the effects of silver against disease have been known for centuries. A possible solution exists that is a very tough sell politically, which is to add a little silver dust to fertilizer. When a field is first plowed, tiny particles (16 or fewer atoms each) of silver are taken up by the roots of plants and protect not only the plants but those who eat them from most infectious diseases to some extent. The airlines are required to press their waste water through silver mesh to disinfect it before jettisoning it, following NASA's lead and using hardware developed for NASA, which also is not allowed to dump water that hasn't been disinfected. A handheld version can be purchased for disinfecting lake water when camping. And silver kills almost every known infectious bacteria, fungus, and, virus.

Colloidal silver is sold bottled, but the technology for making it as it should be apparently hasn't been developed, so companies cheat a little by adding albumin to the mix. There are machines sold by mail order with which people can make the real thing fresh by electrolysis. But who's going to bother? It requires distilled water. And I'm not so sure about the quality even then. But as a bottled product, the real thing (no albumin) would have too short a shelf live to be commercially viable. But adding silver dust to fertilizer would imitate what happened in the days of hunter-gatherers, when trace minerals in the soil were not depleted by reuse of land for agriculture. And so far, pathogens have not been known to develop resistance to silver. But a piece of silver in the bloodstream has to be very tiny, and one chunk can kill a huge number or germs before it passes out of the body through the skin.

People have complained that colloidal silver can cause argyria, a slight discoloration of the skin, which is actually harmless and only noticeable if someones takes huge amounts of albumin-suspended silver to fight some disease resistant to everything else and keeps getting reinfected.

At some point the pathogens are going to win. But any solution capable of eliminating infectious disease would scare the hell out of the medical community, wouldn't it? Theoretically, any technology capable of that would raise the choice of putting half the doctors out of business or passing on it and suffering widespread hardship, perhaps even extinction. In the case of silver, the list of pathogens resistant to it is very short. It actually doesn't need FDA approval, since it was in use before the FDA was formed, making it exempt from the approval process under the FDA's charter. But they can still stop venders from making claims about it.

Many people know that dropping a dime into a vase of water with cut flowers with delay wilting, but a penny will do that, too, since copper has the same effect, albeit to a less extent than silver. In the days of covered wagons heading west, it was common to toss a silver dollar into a barrel of milk to delay souring.

There has been some bad press about colloidal silver, but one has to wonder about the motives behind it, since treating infectious disease is really big business. And the effects of silver against disease have been known for centuries. If you ask a doctor about it, the response is, "Never heard of it." Plausible deniability maybe, true maybe.
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