The Official Star Trek Movie Forum

The Official Star Trek Movie Forum > Star Trek > General Star Trek Discussions > Trek Tech > Ships, Devices, etc. > Replicators
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-04-2009, 01:45 PM
Roysten's Avatar
Roysten Roysten is offline
Commander
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Yorkshire, England
Posts: 924
Default Replicators

Have just been wondering about the way replicators work. Using technology like the transporter except rather than storing the data at a quantum level store it on a molecular level creating food and objects from atoms upwards.

I was thinking about how it prepares food and drink, you order a glass of water at a particular temperature and that's what you get. I'm guessing you can state whether you want hard or soft water and exactly how much of certain minerals are present in there, am guessing you can also tweak it so that it may contain perhaps vitamins etc.

Will the same thing apply to food? Obviously certain things like how many potatoes you get in a Sunday roast could be modified and probably how the food is laid out on the plate can be varied. But what about the taste? I always envisioned replicators getting their database by having a load of chefs making meals and putting them inside to be analysed and stored in the database for future use. Would in that case all instances of the same meal taste the same? We've seen instances where people ask for blend number 7 or feline supplement 263 but would there be some inbuilt function in the replicator to vary how the meal tastes, perhaps by simulating different ripeness in fruits or maturity of cheeses for example...

Hope people understand what I'm getting at, reading back it is quite a mishmash of questions .
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-04-2009, 02:13 PM
horatio's Avatar
horatio horatio is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,282
Default

I guess that's precisely how it is meant to work, you cook a meal, put it through a transporter, then the data is extracted and stored.
The idea with the molecural and quantum level serves two purposes, it prevents the data storage and replication of persons and it explains the imperfection of food replication. Might be hard to notice when you order fried potatoes, but the taste of spices or wine might be a bit different than that of the original.

It is also nice to point out that instead of a kitchen, you "simply" need a more elaborate Wastewater system. I guess that plates and glasses are either not decomposed by the replicator-transporter but merely cleaned or the basic material, e.g. glass, is stored somewhere.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-04-2009, 02:26 PM
Captain Tom Coughlin's Avatar
Captain Tom Coughlin Captain Tom Coughlin is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USS Meadowlands
Posts: 10,990
Default

All I know is that if I had one I'd probably gain 100lbs. Way to easy to say "Computer, Nachos" anytime I would feel like it
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-04-2009, 02:42 PM
Captain Tom Coughlin's Avatar
Captain Tom Coughlin Captain Tom Coughlin is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USS Meadowlands
Posts: 10,990
Default

Beer is far too important a commodity to trust to replicators. I would have a stash somewhere!
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:17 PM
Howlin' Wolf's Avatar
Howlin' Wolf Howlin' Wolf is offline
Lieutenant Commander
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Outpost #31
Posts: 753
Default

Seems to me where you'd run into problems is in the aging aspect of foods and beverages. A friend of mine likes to make his own soda pop(it's kikass) and it has a slightly different flavor after going through the fermenting process. It's the same with beers, liquors and wines. I don't see a replicator correctly reproducing that and evidently they can't or there wouldn't have been some griping about "synthetic Romulan Ale." Then there's all the various cheeses, Italian meats etc. that attain their flavor through aging.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:40 PM
Roysten's Avatar
Roysten Roysten is offline
Commander
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Yorkshire, England
Posts: 924
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howlin' Wolf View Post
Seems to me where you'd run into problems is in the aging aspect of foods and beverages. A friend of mine likes to make his own soda pop(it's kikass) and it has a slightly different flavor after going through the fermenting process. It's the same with beers, liquors and wines. I don't see a replicator correctly reproducing that and evidently they can't or there wouldn't have been some griping about "synthetic Romulan Ale." Then there's all the various cheeses, Italian meats etc. that attain their flavor through aging.
Aging can be simplified to the idea of certain compounds within the food oxidising and hence the food slowly decays, good for some bad for others. I don't see why this couldn't be simulated if it's simply a case of increasing the proportions of certain molecules within the food. Though I imagine it may not be as simple as that. I doubt very much your friends Soda Pop could be replicated with the option to alter its taste according to the fermentation process without knowing exactly what's going on, not something they could just program in like they seem to in the show.

Quote:
Beer is far too important a commodity to trust to replicators. I would have a stash somewhere!
Alcohol is an interesting one, they have synthehol, I very much doubt it could do a good beer justice. How about other toxins in food? Sometimes a small amount of the bad stuff makes things taste good, replicators can't program anything toxic so I imagine that changes the taste.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:44 PM
Captain Tom Coughlin's Avatar
Captain Tom Coughlin Captain Tom Coughlin is offline
Fleet Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USS Meadowlands
Posts: 10,990
Default

Worf was able to replicate some kind of Klingon drink for those psuedo Irish guys. I'm not so sure it can't make alcohol
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:49 PM
Roysten's Avatar
Roysten Roysten is offline
Commander
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Yorkshire, England
Posts: 924
Default

That's true, maybe it's an officers privilege to bypass certain restrictions.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:06 PM.


Forum theme courtesy of Mark Lambert
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2009 by Paramount Pictures. STAR TREK and all related
marks and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.