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  #21  
Old 07-13-2008, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by DrTaylor View Post
nd Questor was really just a ripoff of "I, Robot". We could do this all day.
You started thsi with 'the Doctor is a copy of Data', which is pretty far from the truth by the way, so don't complain
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  #22  
Old 07-14-2008, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by DrTaylor View Post
nd Questor was really just a ripoff of "I, Robot". We could do this all day.
Actually that's a Rip Off too, if you want to get serious. Here's a ncie quote on the topic from an internet article.

"Issac Asimov in 1940 in his very first book of short stories, "I, Robot". But Asimov didn't first come up with the idea of the "robot". In fact, as with most of human thought, the origins can be traced back to early history.

Egyptian and Sumerian cultures 5000 years ago told legends where gods would "breathe life" into inanimate statues. The "Golem", a clay figure brought to life by Kabbalistic means, is a Hebrew myth that is mentioned in the Talmud. Homer's epic poem, "The Iliad" mentions "mechanical servants". The idea of a "mechanical servant" is ancient. In the 13th century, the advancement of clockwork gave birth to "automata", sometimes very intricately designed mechanical artworks which sometimes incorporated the human form. The automata were not true "robots", and the term had yet to be imagined. The word "robot" can be traced to it's first usage by the Czech playwright Karel Çapek in 1918 in a short story and again in his 1921 play R. U. R., which stood for Rossum's Universal Robots. In the first of many stories revolving around the theme of mechanical rebellion, in the play R.U.R., Rossum creates a race of mechanical servants who rebel, dominate mankind, and eventually wipe out the human race."
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  #23  
Old 07-14-2008, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Zardoz View Post
Actually that's a Rip Off too, if you want to get serious. Here's a ncie quote on the topic from an internet article.

"Issac Asimov in 1940 in his very first book of short stories, "I, Robot". But Asimov didn't first come up with the idea of the "robot". In fact, as with most of human thought, the origins can be traced back to early history.

Egyptian and Sumerian cultures 5000 years ago told legends where gods would "breathe life" into inanimate statues. The "Golem", a clay figure brought to life by Kabbalistic means, is a Hebrew myth that is mentioned in the Talmud. Homer's epic poem, "The Iliad" mentions "mechanical servants". The idea of a "mechanical servant" is ancient. In the 13th century, the advancement of clockwork gave birth to "automata", sometimes very intricately designed mechanical artworks which sometimes incorporated the human form. The automata were not true "robots", and the term had yet to be imagined. The word "robot" can be traced to it's first usage by the Czech playwright Karel Çapek in 1918 in a short story and again in his 1921 play R. U. R., which stood for Rossum's Universal Robots. In the first of many stories revolving around the theme of mechanical rebellion, in the play R.U.R., Rossum creates a race of mechanical servants who rebel, dominate mankind, and eventually wipe out the human race."
The Golem, great point And wow, even Homer already wrote about robots, but he cannot charge anyone anymore for copyright violations
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  #24  
Old 07-14-2008, 02:06 PM
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Picardo brought a lot of heart to the character and was constantly pitching ideas, lines, etc always striving to make the character more interesting - sadly I think much moreso than many other members of the cast and writing team even. He was a strong advocate for his character and thus the character was better - much like Nimoy.
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  #25  
Old 07-24-2008, 11:48 AM
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Robert Picardo is great all around. I admire his work as an actor.
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  #26  
Old 07-24-2008, 11:48 AM
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Robert Picardo is great all around. I admire his work as an actor.
A great and solid charater actor.
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  #27  
Old 07-24-2008, 07:54 PM
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I think, personally he was a really great way of getting an 'everyman' into the trek world, that otherwise is pretty hard to do (except for getting 'murdoch' into the Enterprise, Ron Moore loves it when a plan comes together)....

And then again, maybe (and I really liked Voyager) it was simply that he was just a well rounded character in a cast of pretty flat ones, fun as they all were to watch there wasn't a lot of depth going on...people had their basic character types setup and you knew how they would react to most situations
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  #28  
Old 07-25-2008, 12:14 AM
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IMO, they didn't do such a great job developing some of the characters on Voyager (i.e. Chakotay, Kim, and Tuvok), and they pushed others in your face way too much (i.e. Janeway, Seven, and Torres). The Doctor was just the right amount that they didn't capture very well in the other characters. Plus Picardo is a great actor. I believe this was the case for Kes as well before she left.
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  #29  
Old 07-25-2008, 03:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horatio View Post
The Golem, great point And wow, even Homer already wrote about robots, but he cannot charge anyone anymore for copyright violations
Oh we could...where that wet noddle for whipping???
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  #30  
Old 08-21-2008, 03:16 PM
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Why?
Two words:








Robert Picardo
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