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Old 05-10-2009, 07:13 AM
JasonSTForever JasonSTForever is offline
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Default Long Range Sensors

Would anyone care to speculate on how a starship's long range or just exterior sensors might actually work? If what I've seen in movie Crimson Tide is real, is sonar-like technology enough to discern a particular type of ship or object? I googled but didn't see anything that stood out, but if anyone knows of good web references by all means point me to them and I'll do my homework

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Jason
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Old 06-14-2009, 12:26 PM
TGElder TGElder is offline
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Long range sensors might also employ the use of telemetry probes, or in established territory the existence of a sensor network. Remember on SeaQuest they had whiskers that were ROV's that relayed readings back to the ship and were linked to it's sonar array.

Star Trek long range sensors seem to use a variety of active and passive scans to build up readings. All of these readings are compiled to put together an image of what they are detecting.
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Old 06-14-2009, 01:07 PM
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Aside from the aforementioned automated probes, starships employ a wide variety of sensors--optical, electromagnetic, subspace, thermal, biological, gravition, plasma wave, etc. They usually fall into one of three basic types--long-range, navigational, and lateral.

Like the communication systems, these arrays involve the use of subspace transceivers to transmit and receive signals travelling at speeds many times faster than a ship at maximum warp. Like any telescope, there's presumably a limit to how far a ship can "see" in any given direction and the resolution of a detected object depends on how far away it is and whether the sensors are looking for that particular object to begin with.

Aboard 24th-Century ships, the operations officer on the bridge seems to be one responsible for allocating particular sensor usage time to the various belowdeck science departments.
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Old 06-14-2009, 03:48 PM
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It should be noted that SONAR or RADAR would be useless in space, as there is no medium for waves to travel through. Sensors would have to rely upon other means of detecting objects.
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Old 06-14-2009, 11:20 PM
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perhaps they cause ripples in space, using technology similar to warp drive, as a type of sonar/radar?
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Old 06-14-2009, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJTrek View Post
It should be noted that SONAR or RADAR would be useless in space, as there is no medium for waves to travel through. Sensors would have to rely upon other means of detecting objects.
But since there's subspace radio, then shouldn't 'subspace radar' be plausible?

I figure that Trek's long-range sensors have to be faster-than-light technology, since they can discern things happening numerous light-years away, while short-range sensors are limited to light or sub-light speeds. After all, Picard's famous 'Picard Manouever' expressly depends on light-speed sensors, according to the Trek encyclopedia.

I get the impression that long-range sensors aren't always totally accurate or reliable, though - or maybe it all depends on the crewmember behind the console. After all, the Reliant never noticed that there was an entire planet missing from the Ceti Alpha system...
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Old 06-19-2009, 06:13 AM
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Subspace sensors just mean faster than light.
From what we understand of them they can (on Intrepid) in pallette form see up to 15 lightyears range and the signal travels through subspace which is another dimension of our universe that lies as a foundation to our own providing a short cut through normal space time.

Subspace has be related to a gravitational realm where this force reigns supreme. It has been theorized that a considerable portion of masses effect is only partially illistrated in our 4 dimensions. Many believing that Gravity should be stronger than the Electro Strong Force think that another dimension binding all other together is where the true effects of gravity can be felt.

Obviously Subspace energy does react with the EM universe in Star Trek.
The response to that effect (whatever it is) can be sensed faster in subspace than in the EM Dimension.

(I persoonally no longer believe in a gravitational dimension like subspace)
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