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  #11  
Old 05-21-2009, 10:06 PM
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Because it's all fanwankery.

Fanboys on either side (Trek or Wars) will go on and on with useless data about how Star Destroyer A might eliminate Constitution class B, or Galaxy Class X might obliterate Death Star Y. I've even done it...and frankly, I find it hilarious.

Fanboys have to justify their fandom with bull****. It is so with Star Trek. It is so with Star Wars... it is so with pretty much all fandoms.


It is so.
Martok2112
Wouldn't it be hilarious if they finally did make a Star Trek/Star Wars crossover movie, and instead of destroying one another and proving which was better, the two genre's ships cooperated for a common purpose. Some uber-fans would let out a puff of smoke and melt if they did that.
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  #12  
Old 05-21-2009, 10:11 PM
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Wouldn't it be hilarious if they finally did make a Star Trek/Star Wars crossover movie, and instead of destroying one another and proving which was better, the two genre's ships cooperated for a common purpose. Some uber-fans would let out a puff of smoke and melt if they did that.
At one point, some years ago, I was working on a story where pretty much the whole of the Alpha Quadrant sided with the Rebel Alliance to take on the Imperial Threat.

And I had a pretty good way of writing how the two universes became so acquainted.

What was even funnier was that (similar to the spirit of Galaxy Quest) I had Star Wars appear as an existing fictional entity in the Star Trek universe, and then, when real-life versions of Star Wars ships appeared, only the few who knew of the Star Wars universe had any remote idea on how to possibly deal with them.
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Old 05-21-2009, 10:37 PM
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I guess it must be insecurity that makes some Star Wars fans bash Trek so much. Example: The recent YouTube video of the Death Star "destroying" the Enterprise. It's such a shame, and so childish, too. Trek fans tend to be more tolerant, I think (although there are exceptions).
I'd like to believe that Trek fans are more tolerant and enlightened because they try to uphold the ideals promoted in the series, but i don't think that's the case.

I see one huge difference between Trek and Wars, while loving both; in Trek the good guys are secular humanists like Roddenberry was, in Wars the good guys are religious spiritualists (Jedi) with trained martial arts combat skills.
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Old 05-21-2009, 11:15 PM
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I see one huge difference between Trek and Wars, while loving both; in Trek the good guys are secular humanists like Roddenberry was, in Wars the good guys are religious spiritualists (Jedi) with trained martial arts combat skills.
Well thats true. Trek has a distinct lack of religion among humans... so far as to call it myth. I'm not a religious person myself but perhaps GR was hoping in the future it will be gone or highly suppressed. An overstatement I am sure but it would have been good if in all these years there was just one major catholic/buddhist/muslim/jewish character. Pick one. I dont mean making a big deal about it just a backstory with some minor story elements. Maybe one celebrating Easter or noon prayer.

Well now that I think about it... its funny but the one major character that has religious/spiritual undertones is the highly logical Spock. Vulcans are highly advanced yet have a very spiritual culture with things like resurection of the body, high priests/priestess's and eternal spirits. A huge character element that adds to the role as opposed to Kirk. In TNG and later Klingons are quite religious also. But never humans from Earth (maybe all humans?). Its interesting.
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Old 05-21-2009, 11:24 PM
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  #16  
Old 05-22-2009, 02:23 AM
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Well thats true. Trek has a distinct lack of religion among humans... so far as to call it myth. I'm not a religious person myself but perhaps GR was hoping in the future it will be gone or highly suppressed. An overstatement I am sure but it would have been good if in all these years there was just one major catholic/buddhist/muslim/jewish character. Pick one. I dont mean making a big deal about it just a backstory with some minor story elements. Maybe one celebrating Easter or noon prayer.

Well now that I think about it... its funny but the one major character that has religious/spiritual undertones is the highly logical Spock. Vulcans are highly advanced yet have a very spiritual culture with things like resurection of the body, high priests/priestess's and eternal spirits. A huge character element that adds to the role as opposed to Kirk. In TNG and later Klingons are quite religious also. But never humans from Earth (maybe all humans?). Its interesting.
Yes, that is interesting! I can't find a quote about it anywhere where he says so, but I think Roddenberry believed that until humanity dumped religion, which it doesn't seem likely to do anytime soon, it wouldn't advance to a stage where there would no longer be things like war, poverty, and disease. So Roddenberry's vision of the future, in this regard, i think is definately utopic. Roddenberry's triumvirate that saves humanity is No Religion, unbrideled Scientific and Technological progress, and some kind of Socialistic World Governement.
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Old 05-22-2009, 06:22 AM
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Can someone please explain to me posters who reply to questions, or posts with palm to the forehead images. I just don't get this!
It is a facepalm poster. Have you ever slapped your face and/or buried your face in your hands due to exasperation? that's what that means
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Old 05-22-2009, 06:54 AM
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I never really considered the Jedi to be any kind of religious order - but I suppose some could read that into it.
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  #19  
Old 05-22-2009, 07:33 AM
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The religious element in Trek is very understated, but that doesn't mean it isn't there. Someone mentioned Vulcan, but what about the Bajorans (DS9)? Sisko himself -- a Starfleet officer -- may have become something of a demigod.
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  #20  
Old 05-22-2009, 11:32 AM
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The religious element in Trek is very understated, but that doesn't mean it isn't there. Someone mentioned Vulcan, but what about the Bajorans (DS9)? Sisko himself -- a Starfleet officer -- may have become something of a demigod.
That is true. Not a demigod but a prophet between Bajorans and their gods. I think he is also considered a mortal prophet not divine one but I'm not sure about that. Still, the religion came from an alien culture. Not our own. The feds respected their religion but there was a curious lack of any from Earth. Not even another priest for the Bajorans to debate with. In fact, IIRC one episode that dealt with a conflict was not against two differing religions but religion vs science. Of course religion vs science is a big issue but religion vs religion (christanity vs islam) is a much bigger one. Why not a story about a priest working to convert Bajorans? What exactly should the feds do about a priest who is not bound by a prime directive?
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