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Old 12-26-2012, 09:30 AM
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kevin kevin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by martok2112 View Post
Here's the bottom line:

It's a story. In the story, the writers have decided that the good guys are good, flaws and all, and the bad guys are bad, flaws and all.

The good guys win, after suffering a horrible loss (billions of Vulcan lives)....the bad guys lose (they all are rallied behind Nero, and what he says, goes). They die no less horrible a death than the billions of Vulcans whose lives they took....justice is done. The good guys save the day, the Earth survives, and the U.S.S. Enterprise continues boldly going forward....'cause they cannae find reverse!

Well that's only because we've diverted into the supposed plight of nameless crew (who I might add we've never had given great consideration before since almost none of the previous films ever asked us to care either) who now may or may not be innocent of the fate dealt them.

The primary villain in a Trek film has always had motivators and reasons for their acts and always pays the price of death (by this measure the movies themselves stand in opposition to the normal TV series route of not always killing off the villain but this is more a function of the difference between TV shows and movies anyway) either by the action or inaction of the crew of the Enterprise. Sure these reasons are not usually complex or even always entirely logical (you just have to accept some things are as they are in Trek!) but they do exist. It's not usually overtly simple (and indeed Nero's reasons are roughly par for the course based on past performance) but neither is it too murky either.

In Star Trek villains remain mostly clear cut.

But I've never been asked to cry for henchmen before so I'm really not going to start now.
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